What Was Your Prep for Today?

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Wed, Sep 28, 2011 - 9:21pm Ratatouille
CYM
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Rat,  go to your local bait

Rat, go to your local bait shop and buy some red worms. Also, you're not supposed to compost citrus.

Thu, Sep 29, 2011 - 5:37pm
Gunrunner
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Hunting season is upon us.

Just filled my tank up in my gas guzzling 4x4 Chevrolet pickup at Krogers for 2.99 with my discount. Have my bow sighted in and 10 more bags of corn for the feeders. Not really happy with the price....9.50 for a fifty pound bag. Last year was 5.50 for the same bags. Might have to think about investing in corn..:)

Have both my large coffins loaded up as I plan to bring home not only deer meat, but also the bacon. We are covered up with hogs this year and am going to fill the 21cf freezer up again to get me through another year with range fed, extra lean meat.

I do my own processing and will have all the different cuts as well as hamburger and sausage.

I would like to recommend to all of you that store your food to purchase a foodsaver or Gamesaver vacuum sealing unit for your home as it can keep meat for up to five years unlike the paper wrapped butcher method. No freezer burn. The bags come with a nice white label stripe on them so you can ID and date the package.

Good luck to all that hunt and be safe.

Bang Bang
Thu, Sep 29, 2011 - 6:09pm Gunrunner
Ojibwemowin
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Hunting

Gunrunner you are talking my language!

I shoot my bow weekly out the back door of the garage at a target about 30 yard away, although I move it around a lot between 10 and 40 yards. Most of our bigger deer come from rifle hunting during the rut, but I love sticking a nice eater with the stick and string in October to get things started!

We just polished off the last package of back straps from last hunting season yesterday evening. Deer are a huge part of our diet, and all of us, including the kids, prefer it to any other red meat. We also love the ruffed grouse as our preferred white meat, but pork is pretty good too!

I use the food saver system as well. I first wrap cuts in paper in case the seal fails, which it does from time to time.

Thu, Sep 29, 2011 - 6:15pm Ojibwemowin
CYM
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Ojibwemowin...  Are you a

Ojibwemowin... Are you a Chippewa?

Thu, Sep 29, 2011 - 11:30pm
tmosley
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I have demolished my

I have demolished my wellhouse, which was eaten up with dryrot, and am building a new one, Earthship style, from tires I procured for free from a local tire shop. I will probably have to order some dirt, as the pile I have doesn't look like it will be enough. A neighbor will (hopefully) help me out by using her bulldozer tractor attachment to move a big pile of leftover dirt from an earlier project over to the new site. I will certainly be getting my workout pounding those tires full of dirt.

Assuming it works out, I already have an order from my mother for a root cellar made in a similar fashion.

Fri, Sep 30, 2011 - 2:24am
Chris P. Bacon
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Stocked another 10 gal of

Stocked another 10 gal of lamp oil (not parafin) for the Deitz lanterns in case the solar system should fail.

Fri, Sep 30, 2011 - 3:24am
diegeiro
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Been canning, stocking and ready to refinance

I've been canning pears. 20 qts. total. Tomatoes are late so will be canning them later this fall.

There is a good deal on canned chicken at Sam's club, (5) 13 oz cans of chicken breasts for just over $10. Ingredients: chicken breast meat, water, salt. I am not a Sam's fan but this is a good product to stack.

I'm also not a pork fan so Eric O's hammies don't do a lot for me, although I have stacked a few of them. Also bought some of the Libbey canned salmon on sale at Walgreens for $1.99 a can a few weeks ago. I try to find expirations that are different and look for different lot numbers as well. In tuna and salmon I have been concerned about mercury so I don't eat these often. Additional concern now is for radiation like cesium and strontium. Getting separate lots and expirations means the likelihood of having multiple cans with the same contaminate is reduced. I am also watching the expiration of everything, keeping the canned goods to a 2014 expiration and later if possible. I also cleaned up the panty using up expired and soon to expire canned goods.

Though about getting a pressure cooker canner in case my freezer goes out I could can up the meats in a hurry. Then i realized that if I loose power I wont have my electric oven either. I may switch to a gas range for that reason alone.

Getting ready to refinance the house with a 10 year portfolio loan at my credit union (they hold it) for 3.25% We figure it will save over 10k in interest from the current loan, pays off the loan 7 years faster, and raises our payments by less than $50 month. I will be adding some cash to buy it down, but should be able to get that back plus the refinance fee by spring of 2013 if we should want to sell by then.

A good mortgage calculator is Karl's morgage calculator because it shows the total amount paid in the summary. I found this extremely helpful in deciding how much to refinance and how much to pay down.

https://www.drcalculator.com/mortgage/

Bankrate.com's mortgage calculator will let you print the amortization schedule to see where you are at each month to determine where the break even price of the refinance is.

Gonna try to sleep now. Insomnia is a bitch

"The next best thing to being wise oneself is to live in a circle of those who are." CS Lewis
Fri, Sep 30, 2011 - 9:37am
ohiometalman
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I have added a large #22 meat

I have added a large #22 meat grinder (1hp LEM) and sausage stuffer to my prep collection this week. I have always processed my own game with a smaller unit and decided it was time to add a larger one to help my friends and family out with processing as cost in Ohio average around $100 for a basic job (at least in my area). As others have mentioned, I also use a vacuum sealers for my meat and I have a large smoker to add variety of flavors. Free range wild beef (deer that is) are the only meat we consume at our house. I have not purchased beef for many many years at the store. Although a beef steak at a restaurant can be very good. I also have a backup generator and fuel reserve in case we go off the grid for any length of time. Having a large smoker available also gives you backup to your frozen food in case you lose the electric and your meat thaws, you can convert it all to jerky and it will last for up to a year.

Tue, Oct 4, 2011 - 8:37pm CYM
Ojibwemowin
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CYM - sorry for not getting

CYM - sorry for not getting back to you sooner. I work a lot during the week and don't always have time to check this forum, even though it is about the only one I take time to look at on a regular basis.

I am Ojibwe in spirit, but would be proud to be in blood. I was adopted into a band of Lake Superior Anishinabe (Chippewa). I lived, raised a family and worked in health care on said reservation for a long time, and also worked in healthcare for first nations people/Anishinabe in remote areas of Canada (NW Ontario). My family has deep roots of exploring and living in remote areas, and over four generations have crossed tracks, shared camps and resources with first nations people throughout the Dakotas, Precambrian shield country in Northern MN and Ontario without any major conflicts or animosity, hence a continued good name among them.

I learned to prep from the original people in North America for whom prepping is deeply ingrained in their culture. The fractional reserve banking system could collapse tomorrow and the traditional people on the Reservation would hardly give it a second thought, other that to say, "I figured that was coming." Their cultural constructs are not bound by time, western cultural trappings, and our temporary fiat based culture. They are generous people and would help anyone with a sincere heart who is in need. I love their language, hence my name "Ojibwemowin," which means The Ojibwe language.

Tue, Oct 4, 2011 - 9:07pm Stuff
Rich MyGold
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Nice proverb!

Nice proverb!

Tue, Oct 4, 2011 - 10:16pm
Gramp
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Continued research on

Continued research on portable Solar power generating systems

I saw that member CaliLawer was talking about Solar power today. When i get a chance I may ask him a few questions.

There are some great small setups on the"Bay", to get an idea.

~ Even a dead Fish can go with the flow ~
Wed, Oct 5, 2011 - 2:05pm
Gunrunner
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Just finished cutting and packing

My bow did what it was designed to do and I added more great lean meat to my freezer. Was a great weekend for deer hunting on opening weekend. My new avatar shows it all for this weekend. Will update my avater as the harvest continues.

I also had a surprise when I arrived home. Another twenty five ounces of silver bars from APMEX. Bought it during this fire sale. After stacking my five proof ATB five ounce pucks, I had very little space left and these just fit. Must upgrade my safe since this sale seems to be ongoing...:)

Bang Bang
Wed, Oct 5, 2011 - 11:31pm Gunrunner
SilverFocker
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Nice Buck

GR........soon I will fill mine. I have seen many but I always get stuck on the one buck....we had a late fawn this year so I am waiting a few more weeks before getting the good stuff, plus I nned to add another freezer.......got half a beef and most of a hog packing the current one, but I am getting calls from my kids wanting Jerky......the DNA is now getting to the grandkids, glad I got another machine.

Wed, Oct 5, 2011 - 11:57pm
tekhneek
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Edible wildlife & growing food

Hey all. New to the forum community but I saw this thread and thought it was awesome to see all the good ideas and information.

Prep for today was more silver... some gold and ammunition but that's not why I'm writing.

I think one of the most crucial things people can learn is how to grow food and how to compost effectively aside from conservation. I'm in Texas, it rained in Austin about a week ago and I collected enough water for about a whole weeks worth of watering. With composting I've been using a Bokashi indoor composting system along with my outdoor leaf/earthworm pile (dump all your old used oil on your paper towels and throw it in the compost pile and watch the worms come) The neat thing about the Bokashi system is that you put your scraps in and pour this bran on the scraps. After you fill it up you can put it in your outdoor compost pile and increase the nutrient content of your pile. Bokashi system's have spouts on the bottom of them so you can release the juices from the microbes that are in the bran. These little guys go crazy on scraps and break them down into an anerobic process. In a bokashi system compost ferments, it never rots. The microbes digest nutrients and "void" them similar to earthworms. They increase the nutrient content and density like earthworms do but in liquid form. You can drain this liquid and mix 1 part compost tea with 50-100 parts water and you've got yourself a weekly fertilizer that WON'T kill your plants. In a controlled study a farmer at the farmers market I go to planted 2 beds. 1 he fertilized with regular fish emulsion/synthetic fertilizer and the other he fertilized with and used bokashi. The bed with the bokashi yielded 3x as much produce and grew almost 3x as big. He also said he uses epsom salt (it's not actually salt) for his tomatoes. Epsom salt increases moisture retention in soil and plants and works. I was trying to grow tomatoes in Texas and couldn't. I finally found Porter tomato seeds so planted those and used some fresh compost as base soil. Before I knew it I had a steady stream of tomatoes.

Oh yeah and the scraps? Bury'em. Within a month you have fresh, perfect soil ready to be planted in. It's miraculous what those little microbes do. Better yet though, the soil retains roughly 30-60% more moisture using the bokashi system.

I'm new to gardening so I'm sure this isn't the only thing out there. Just my personal experience.

You can read more/learn about bokashi here (I got mine at the farmers market and I own 1 of these things. I don't have a single damn stake in the company other than the fact that they're really awesome people and have helped me produce a lot of my own food)

https://www.microbialearth.com/ -- and if you live in Austin you can buy their $100 system and the city will send you a cheque for $75. In effect you pay $25 for a standby bin, bokashi system and 2 bags of bran (lasts about 4 months)

Back to growing food and the point initially of my post. As I've said already I live in Texas and we've had the worst drought of my life this past summer so most of the summer garden got slaughtered aside from a few plants like peppers, okra, cherry tomatoes, etc.

The thing that I want to point out is everyone should be learning about edible wildlife. I've begun growing 3 plants which I think are grossly under grown and could have an enormous impact on your long term food self reliance. Like I said most of my plants died or produced nil the ones that didn't were:

  1. Malabar spinach (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basella_alba) In fact, it grew up the entire side of my house and just yesterday I cut off about 10 pounds of it. The entire thing is edible and if you want to start more simply cut off a tip, bury in the ground water it and wait. It's a climbing vine so if you string it upwards you can literally grow shade and food a the same time which is what I'm doing. It's highly drought tolerant and requires little to no watering. Some times I'd be out of town for a week (was in California) and I came back and it was just fine. It's rapidly growing and has some very potent vitamins and phytonutrients. If you had to, you could survive on this plant alone for awhile.
  2. Tree spinach or Chaya (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnidoscolus_aconitifolius) - This is an AWESOME plant that tastes DELICIOUS. The leaves are believed to be highly toxic though unless boiled, but if you boil them, from what I've read the brew (called chaya mansa sometimes) that remains can essentially be a substitute for insulin in people with diabetes. This plant is a ferocious grower and requires very little watering as well. It grows like a shrub and the leaves are delicious once boiled. I have read there is 2 strains of Chaya. One that is toxic (but can be boiled) and one that is not toxic and the leaves can basically be eaten raw. I haven't tried it, but I would if I was hungry enough probably. You can restart plants simply by cutting stems that are about 6" wide. It spreads like crazy though. I didn't really have to do much besides plant it and water it. Now I have a huge shrub that could literally be food for at least 3 months if I was to pluck the leaves (they just grow faster and faster anyway) girlfriend made veggie lasagna with the leaves and man was it good. Oh yeah -- and it's 3x as nutrient dense as regular spinach.
    *Tree spinach study on diabetes: https://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1996/v3-516.html

  3. Magenta spreen (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chenopodium_giganteum) - This plant is delicious too. It grows massive (giganteum) and has a really pretty magenta powder center that's edible and could be used for color... or whatever. It's basically wild swiss chard. It grows like crazy in droughts too.

Just wanted to share some of my gardening experience. I was so frustrated with traditional spinach/veggies I went out looking. This is what I've found so far. I also avidly collect heirloom/second generation seeds and chronicle what works/fails.

Whew. Hope this helps. I've also experienced awesome results with Porter and Porter improved t0matoe seeds as well as Phoenix seeds.

I agree wholeheartedly with a few others wisdom earlier. Get to know your neighbors and closely. I BBQ/share/eat with my neighbors almost 3-4 times per week. We all combine fiat and whatever's going bad in the fridge/freezer so as not to waste anything. Neighbor's a mechanic too so, I get my breaks changed at cost so it works out in more ways than one. Chances are if I'm not in the garden on the weekend I'm with one of my neighbors doing something.

Just my two cents. Looking forward to contributing more here.

Thanks turd/others.

Sup tmos.

Fri, Oct 14, 2011 - 5:19pm
tmosley
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Still pounding tires.  I'm

Still pounding tires. I'm getting a lot stronger. I might look like one of those old time circus strongmen before too long (but with hair ;) ).

Sat, Oct 15, 2011 - 10:53am
Vernon Wormer
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Soaker hose on the roof

Hey T Mosley, wanted to say thanks for the heads up on the soaker hose on the roof. The first month it was running was warmer than the previous month and my energy bill was 33% less. It more than paid for itself in one month. Thanks again.

Sat, Oct 15, 2011 - 4:29pm Vernon Wormer
tmosley
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Vernon Wormer wrote: Hey T

Vernon Wormer wrote:

Hey T Mosley, wanted to say thanks for the heads up on the soaker hose on the roof. The first month it was running was warmer than the previous month and my energy bill was 33% less. It more than paid for itself in one month. Thanks again.

Glad to hear it. It has cooled off here, so I turned mine off. Not really sure what to do with them now. I considered taking them off the roof, but they are kind of a pain to get up there and arranged just so, whereas if I leave them up there, they may be full of holes next summer. I think I am just going to leave them this year, and if I have to get back up there in the spring, then so be it. I will disconnect the hoses from the water source before the first freeze threatens us.

Sun, Oct 16, 2011 - 5:20am
Perfidious Albion
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Bottle light

a plastic bottle, water, and a few drops of chlorine and salt is all they need to light up the inside of homes that have no electricity.

https://www.treehugger.com/files/2011/09/myshelter-foundation-lighting-up-homes-with-plastic-bottle-and-chlorine.php

Sprouts... the way forward.. https://www.sproutpeople.com/

Humble newbie listening and learning. A lemming doesn't last long these days..
Fri, Nov 11, 2011 - 4:24pm
Prize Fighter
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Asymptote, this is a few

Asymptote, this is a few months late but thanks for posting the Australian weapon laws. I had no idea. You being into martial arts I noticed you can't have nunchuks?? That's got to upset some who can't practice certain disciplines. No throwing stars, blowguns, mace, baton, S&M whips, handcuffs, or fun allowed. What a bummer. No spearguns or slingshots? I guess there is no spearfishing?? Really makes me appreciate our 2nd Amendment and my gun collection even more.

Today I took delivery of 840 5.56 rounds, 1000 9mm rounds and 250 12ga. Been putting that off and it feels good. It was like buying my first silver. Buying that much of any one thing which I had never owned in quantity before is a foreign process. Now I want more. Oh my.

Also signed up for the concealed carry class at my local Sheriff's department. Really been putting this off for a long time. Debated on whether I wanted to be on that list. Over time I've met and talked at length with several of their deputies at the local gun shop. They're all good dudes and made me feel more comfortable with the decision. Not sure I want to actually carry but at a minimum I would like to be able to legally have it in my vehicle and shoot random roadsigns and whatnot. They said I could do that if I got my American Cowboy license. You just have to prove you can still shoot the side of a barn after a sixer. Done deal.

Happy Veterans Day...

Video unavailable
Wed, Dec 7, 2011 - 12:29pm
treefrog
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calendar expires 21 december, 2012

treefrog land and cattle co.
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