stashes for bartering??

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Laineyisat
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stashes for bartering??

I just finished watching a video that someone posted (sorry - lost my place - I don't  remember who posted it!) of the global bartering network that is providing alternative money in Argentina.... awesome video... really made me think... What should I be stashing for bartering's sake??? I realize this will vary depending upon where we are and we have.... but what are your plans for bartering ????

Edited by admin on 11/08/2014 - 05:06
jrobb316
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For bartering I have or am

For bartering I have or am accumulating 90% us coin, 14k rings and jewelry, food, soap, tp, and ammo. From what I read the wedding rings etc are just as good as pure gold in that situation, or better. I will save my .999 gold/silver in hopes I make it to the other side and can start new. Also alcohol is probably a #1 barter item with an infinite shelf life.

CoalCracker
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Bartering

I would assume you can barter with just about anything - Gold or Silver jewelry, ammunition, food, water, tools or even clothes.  It may even depend on the area that you live in or the situation that you end up with more of something that someone else needs.  I am even growing tobacco for just that reason; I don't smoke but I am sure that at some point, I can use it to trade for something that I need.

RockinJohnnyT
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Things to THINK about.

Bartering:

DO NOT barter with Silver/Gold - you are MARKING yourself as a TARGET.  Save your silver and gold for after everything passes for wealth.  If you go to barter, try to go as far away as you can so that no one knows you. 

Bullets, matches - things of that nature should do well in the beginning.  Just something to think of.

uptofreedom
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Bullets, booze and smokes are

Bullets, booze and smokes are high on my list.  Want to learn how to make moonshine.  Anything on the list below will be in high demand...

From: http://beforeitsnews.com/story/234/695/Top_100_Items_to_Disappear_First_During_a_National_Emergency.html

1. Generators (Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy…target of thieves; maintenance etc.)
2. Water Filters/Purifiers
3. Portable Toilets
4. Seasoned Firewood. Wood takes about 6 – 12 months to become dried, for home uses.
5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps (First Choice: Buy CLEAR oil. If scarce, stockpile ANY!)
6. Coleman Fuel. Impossible to stockpile too much.
7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats & Slingshots.
8. Hand-can openers, & hand egg beaters, whisks.
9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugar
10. Rice – Beans – Wheat
11. Vegetable Oil (for cooking) Without it food burns/must be boiled etc.,)
12. Charcoal, Lighter Fluid (Will become scarce suddenly)
13. Water Containers (Urgent Item to obtain.) Any size. Small: HARD CLEAR PLASTIC ONLY – note – food grade if for drinking.
16. Propane Cylinders (Urgent: Definite shortages will occur.)
17. Survival Guide Book.
18. Mantles: Aladdin, Coleman, etc. (Without this item, longer-term lighting is difficult.)
19. Baby Supplies: Diapers/formula. ointments/aspirin, etc.
20. Washboards, Mop Bucket w/wringer (for Laundry)
21. Cookstoves (Propane, Coleman & Kerosene)
22. Vitamins
23. Propane Cylinder Handle-Holder (Urgent: Small canister use is dangerous without this item)
24. Feminine Hygiene/Haircare/Skin products.
25. Thermal underwear (Tops & Bottoms)
26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets, Wedges (also, honing oil)
27. Aluminum Foil Reg. & Heavy Duty (Great Cooking and Barter Item)
28. Gasoline Containers (Plastic & Metal)
29. Garbage Bags (Impossible To Have Too Many).
30. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, Paper Towels
31. Milk – Powdered & Condensed (Shake Liquid every 3 to 4 months)
32. Garden Seeds (Non-Hybrid) (A MUST)
33. Clothes pins/line/hangers (A MUST)
34. Coleman’s Pump Repair Kit
35. Tuna Fish (in oil)
36. Fire Extinguishers (or..large box of Baking Soda in every room)
37. First aid kits
38. Batteries (all sizes…buy furthest-out for Expiration Dates)
39. Garlic, spices & vinegar, baking supplies
40. Big Dogs (and plenty of dog food)
41. Flour, yeast & salt
42. Matches. {“Strike Anywhere” preferred.) Boxed, wooden matches will go first
43. Writing paper/pads/pencils, solar calculators
44. Insulated ice chests (good for keeping items from freezing in Wintertime.)
45. Workboots, belts, Levis & durable shirts
46. Flashlights/LIGHTSTICKS & torches, “No. 76 Dietz” Lanterns
47. Journals, Diaries & Scrapbooks (jot down ideas, feelings, experience; Historic Times)
48. Garbage cans Plastic (great for storage, water, transporting – if with wheels)
49. Men’s Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash/floss, nail clippers, etc
50. Cast iron cookware (sturdy, efficient)
51. Fishing supplies/tools
52. Mosquito coils/repellent, sprays/creams
53. Duct Tape
54. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes
55. Candles
56. Laundry Detergent (liquid)
57. Backpacks, Duffel Bags
58. Garden tools & supplies
59. Scissors, fabrics & sewing supplies
60. Canned Fruits, Veggies, Soups, stews, etc.
61. Bleach (plain, NOT scented: 4 to 6% sodium hypochlorite)
62. Canning supplies, (Jars/lids/wax)
63. Knives & Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel
64. Bicycles…Tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc
65. Sleeping Bags & blankets/pillows/mats
66. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)
67. Board Games, Cards, Dice
68. d-con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer
69. Mousetraps, Ant traps & cockroach magnets
70. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks)
71. Baby wipes, oils, waterless & Antibacterial soap (saves a lot of water)
72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.
73. Shaving supplies (razors & creams, talc, after shave)
74. Hand pumps & siphons (for water and for fuels)
75. Soysauce, vinegar, bullions/gravy/soupbase
76. Reading glasses
77. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)
78. “Survival-in-a-Can”
79. Woolen clothing, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens
80. Boy Scout Handbook, / also Leaders Catalog
81. Roll-on Window Insulation Kit (MANCO)
82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky
83. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts
84. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc. (extras)
85. Lumber (all types)
86. Wagons & carts (for transport to and from)
87. Cots & Inflatable mattress’s
88. Gloves: Work/warming/gardening, etc.
89. Lantern Hangers
90. Screen Patches, glue, nails, screws,, nuts & bolts
91. Teas
92. Coffee
93. Cigarettes
94. Wine/Liquors (for bribes, medicinal, etc,)
95. Paraffin wax
96. Glue, nails, nuts, bolts, screws, etc.
97. Chewing gum/candies
98. Atomizers (for cooling/bathing)
99. Hats & cotton neckerchiefs
100. Livestock

Jasper Puddlemaker
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Laineyisat wrote:  I realize

Laineyisat wrote:

I realize this will vary depending upon where we are and we have.... but what are your plans for bartering ????

This might come across as flippant, but it isn't meant to.  My plan is to barter what I have too much of for something that is critical to have at the time.  In other words, I have no formal plan for bartering; it is on an "as needed" basis only.  Most likely what I would end up bartering is my labor (using my tools and equipment).  We stock what we know we would need for an extended period.  We can be self-sufficient for a number of months, which I think would be enough time for the monetary system, and society,  to stabilize. 

I have no plans to trade our firearms or ammunition or fuel or essential items.  Seems like that would be counterproductive (and could get us killed).

HiHo Silver
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One question that nags me for

How long is the question that nags me for planning purposes:  Just how long will such a crisis last?  It can't go on forever or there won't be many people left. However, that eventuality seems to fit the UN's Agenda 21 and the Georgia Guide Stones take on the population. Weimar and Argentina seem to be a template, but neither of them were the Reserve Currency of the world.  And the amount of worldwide debt is also a factor considering it immense size.

So, how long will it go on for assuming that it will happen at all? (It seems mathematically that a collapse is certain).

Jasper Puddlemaker
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HiHo Silver wrote: How long

HiHo Silver wrote:

How long is the question that nags me for planning purposes...Weimar and Argentina seem to be a template, but neither of them were the Reserve Currency of the world.  And the amount of worldwide debt is also a factor considering it immense size.

I agree with the Weimar and Argentina "templates."  We sometimes forget that world reserve currencies always crash, or cease to be, and a replacement is chosen.  It is just our turn to experience it.  A new reserve currency will be established, and world commerce will continue.  I'm guessing 2-3 months of serious supply disruptions, followed by several years of diminished "choices" on shelves.  I think it will be more in line with what I experienced in so many foreign countries; greatly diminished amount of choices because the market could not support the inventories, plus lower quality to keep items affordable for average people.   I think local food production will return fairly quickly (1-3 years), with manufacturing returning to US shores over a number of years.  I don't think the US will descend into a "Mad Max" climate like so many preppers seem to expect or want, though there will be the usual pockets of insanity in the usual cities.  (These opinions depend upon Americans wising up, firing the swine who got us into this mess, and acting like the Americans who built this country into what is was.  If not, all bets are off.)

Captain Benny
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jrobb316 wrote:Also alcohol

jrobb316 wrote:
Also alcohol is probably a #1 barter item with an infinite shelf life.

For me, alcohol is not for bartering, but instead for the day off you have when SHTF and you'd just like to have a short retreat from being on a continual guard.   If violence escalates, you'd of course want your neighborhood watch to be in charge of security while you imbibe on your short holiday.  A human soul cannot live in balance when in a continual state of fear or defense.  For me, alcohol helps keep the balance.  It's also a "retreat" back to a "better days" as most people have positive memories of fun times being buzzed by a beer or some good wine or alcohol.

I'd rather barter excess junk silver than by booze.  I'm not very big on the idea of bartering ammo either.  Trading ammo to those I do not trust 100% with my life is a big mistake!  Those are the people most likely to either use the ammo against me one day down the road or would barter that ammo away to someone who would.  For me, I'll be giving ammo out freely to those I trust who aren't so prepared as I.  Ammo is for mutual security, not personal gain!  Funny thing though, all my buddies who own firearms have enough ammo in their calibres to not need any assistance from me. :)

HiHo Silver
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Jasper Puddlemaker

Jasper Puddlemaker wrote:

HiHo Silver wrote:

How long is the question that nags me for planning purposes...Weimar and Argentina seem to be a template, but neither of them were the Reserve Currency of the world.  And the amount of worldwide debt is also a factor considering it immense size.

I agree with the Weimar and Argentina "templates."  We sometimes forget that world reserve currencies always crash, or cease to be, and a replacement is chosen.  It is just our turn to experience it.  A new reserve currency will be established, and world commerce will continue.  I'm guessing 2-3 months of serious supply disruptions, followed by several years of diminished "choices" on shelves.  I think it will be more in line with what I experienced in so many foreign countries; greatly diminished amount of choices because the market could not support the inventories, plus lower quality to keep items affordable for average people.   I think local food production will return fairly quickly (1-3 years), with manufacturing returning to US shores over a number of years.  I don't think the US will descend into a "Mad Max" climate like so many preppers seem to expect or want, though there will be the usual pockets of insanity in the usual cities.  (These opinions depend upon Americans wising up, firing the swine who got us into this mess, and acting like the Americans who built this country into what is was.  If not, all bets are off.)

I tend to agree, it should not last all that long or it will be anarchy and a very dangerous position. I do not see "Mad Max" everywhere, LA and Boston, Cleveland, places with large dependent populations I feel will be very violent in the short term. And that will radiate out and diminish with distance.  Not to say smaller towns won't see some excitement.

silverbleve
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Info for Home Distillers

I see others here anticipate homeade booze a keen barter item, I am very firmly in this camp and have been for a long time. Started out in 2008 with a simple copper still I made myself, now I've moved up to a modified water distiller. 

My plan is, if/when tshtf, I'll be happy to trade one liter quality homemade bourbon for your one ounce silver rounds. Line forms to the left!

Everyone loves booze right? I've made lots and lots of rum, thats my personal fav, but if you want to get started vodka is way easier. Vodka by definition has no flavor, so all you really have to do is keep running it through the still until all the flavor is gone, hence the common term "triple distilled"

Also, when the booze comes out of the still it is usually more than 90 percent alcohol. Yes you read that right, 180+ proof for you retail buyers. Standard practice in distilling is to mix what you get from the still 50/50 with water. 

I don't do that because its easier to store and takes up less space. 

I have some whiskey from 08 I have been aged in toasted oak chips that is just now getting that "oaky" flavor that many people like. Yes my whiskey is 180 proof still when I drink it. 

Here is a quick FAQ for anyone interested in getting started:

http://homedistiller.org/faq.htm

Word of warning though, this is all highly illegal anywhere in the USA (thanks uncle sam!)

Here is a link to the yeast I use:

http://www.homebrewing.org/Liquor-Quik-Alcobase-23-Turbo-Yeast_p_1945.html

It has an easy recipe on there too to get started.

If you care to delve further, everything you need to know can be found on this forum:

http://homedistiller.org/forum/

Oh one last thing I have to add, when it comes out of the still fresh and is still 90+ percent alcohol, if you are hard up for gas you can dump that right into your car/truck and it runs great, burns totally clean and engine runs fine. 

Brazil has been doing this since the 70's on a huge nationwide scale, except they mix the booze (also called pure ethanol) 50/50 with their petrol.

If you ever have trouble passing smog, mix your gas with ethanol like this and you are guaranteed a pass.

inb4 anyone asks if drinking it will make you go blind, no that's an urban myth look it up yourself.

Mike7.62
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Jasper

I think that the very real possibility exists for the "Mad Max" scenario to play out in our larger cities. Interrupt or make worthless the transfer payments, and combine that with supply disruptions and you could very well see large population centers turn into "Thunderdome" within days.  Add to that the large gang population in these areas and you have one very toxic cocktail. Plan for the worst and hope for the best.

As to the OP's subject, the primary things that I would use for barter are airline bottles of booze, tobacco of all sorts, but the pipe tobacco would seem to be the most storable type, toilet paper, matches, and .22 LR ammo. The TP is the only bulky item, but then again you can store that for yourself and use the others for barter.

Mike7.62
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S. Bleve

How do you get your feed stock? IOW, who supplies your grain to distill? Do you grow it, or are you dependent upon a local supplier? How secure are his supplies? In the short term, I can see .gov appropriating any large stores of grain and cracking down very hard on persons using it for distilling spirits. They have a history of doing so-not saying it's right, just a fact.

silverbleve
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Good Point Mike7

Right now I just use sugar, 50lb bags of brown and white I buy in bulk. If I had to though I could in theory grow my own corn and use that, I have the land for it.

Mike7.62
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S. Bleve

Hell, if you do that you could even get a subsidy, as you are growing it for ethanol, correct? LOL.

Jasper Puddlemaker
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I could be wrong (been thinking about it today)...

Mike7.62 wrote:

I think that the very real possibility exists for the "Mad Max" scenario to play out in our larger cities...Plan for the worst and hope for the best.

I admit that I might be overly optimistic on the resilience and capabilities of the American population.  I derive a lot of my conclusions from history, which gives me hope.  But...I was thinking today how we have the most helpless population of Americans, and certainly the highest percentage of shortsighted and ignorant people, that we have ever had. 

I'm certain that, in the past, if somebody like Greenspan stood before congress and repeatedly strung random words together to make meaningless phrases, or if somebody like the Bernank said as many stupid and obviously wrong things as he does, both those guys would have gotten their asses run out of town.  But not now; politicians, media, and Americans hang on these guy's words like they are direct from God Almighty.  In the past I don't think people like that would not have gotten away with such idiocy for very long.

So maybe things will go down differently than they have at other critical moments in our history.  Maybe when the french fries and extra-big burritos do run out at the local drive thru the cities really will erupt in chaos like never before.  Could be. 

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Bartering System

I guess it all depends on what you will be bartering for. What will you need that you forgot to stock up on that will be hard to find later on. Toilet Paper is a good one even though its bulky. TP seems like something that would run out pretty quick (need something to clean the fan off right?)

There was a post on the old blog about someone who lived through hyperinflation in europe, and they had a room full of all kinds of stuff to trade with. They traded things to get food. 

Shouldnt our preparedness be focused on stockpiling things enough that we don't have to go in to bartertown?

valleygirl
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Some very good ideas here.

Some very good ideas here. And I agree about NOT giving away ammo, especially to strangers.

Funny, although I've been prepping for years, it wasn't until this thread that I thought of old M*A*S*H episodes -- Radar and Klinger working barter deals all over Korea to get things the unit needed, like penicillin and generators.

What did everyone want and would pay dearly for? Well, off the top of my head...booze, especially good Scotch, Winchester's cognac, French wine. The canvas bathtub Hawkeye ordered during the horribly hot summer. Reading material (mystery novels, comic books) and phonograph records. Medical supplies and blankets.

Strawberry ice cream when Radar had his tonsils out. Good food and treats of various kinds -- canned peaches, for one, and chocolate bars. Winter gear: long johns, parkas, fur-lined gloves. Clean shirts, socks, underwear. Nylon stockings, bubble bath, and cosmetics for the nurses. And R&R passes to catch a break from the exhausting work.

And the locals simply wanted sustenance-level items: food and blankets. They were so hard up that, even when they had pneumonia, they'd sell the antibiotics and other drugs the doctors gave them -- just to get food for the family.

I gotta watch more of those old episodes and pay attention to what other items were hot tickets...this is stuff based on real history and human nature.

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Booze and Smokes

I've read enough articles on Russia, Argentina, et al that I know that Booze and Smokes are always in demand.  They become currency of their own.  If you are serious about this, go to the warehouse store and stock up on cases and cases of the cheapest Booze and Smokes you can get your hands on.

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Jasper Puddlemaker
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Eric Original wrote:  If you

Eric Original wrote:

If you are serious about this, go to the warehouse store and stock up on cases and cases of the cheapest Booze and Smokes you can get your hands on.

Being a non-smoker I have never thought too much about stocking up on smokes.  But it does seem to make quite a lot of sense from a barter standpoint.  They are fairly expensive, but packs are divisible.  They don't take up much room.  People have to have them because of their addiction.  I would not run down my supply prior to needing them because I don't use them.  Yes, makes sense.  I think I would be hanging on to my tequila, so smokes make sense.

silverbleve
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community helps

I could go without cigs easier than trying to make due without my booze. My method lets me produce excellent rum for a little over $2 a gallon, so that is my main barter item if tshtf

One thing no one has mentioned is bartering for services. The thread from the old blog mentioned above said they bartered for medical care. Skills of many kinds I'm sure will remain valuable. People still will need doctors, dentists, electricians and even musicians.

I think another idea that will help is the building of barter contacts and community before anything happens. I used to have chickens, but it turns out its much easier to make friends with a guy who has a chicken farm and trade him whiskey for eggs and meat. (just eggs so far, I call him the eggman)

Knowing who to call when you need something and where to find other people who are aware and prepared as we are I think will have a value unto itself. 

No need to go into bartertown if you can get everything you need from a few individuals you build relationships with beforehand.

Still havent really figured out toilet paper though. Its not worth stockpiling because its so expensive and bulky.

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