My Neighborhood & Increasing Lawlessness

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#1 Sun, Apr 29, 2012 - 1:43am
Rear Flank Downdraft
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My Neighborhood & Increasing Lawlessness

Blossoming crime sprees, neighborhood collapses, preparatory measures being taken, SHTF scenarios all make for riveting reading-- when they aren't happening to your neighborhood! My job required me to travel a few hours away on an overnight trip that began yesterday. I get a text from my friend a half block down from me who was racing home from his work to be with his sister, who was watching his two year old there, as was her job. They were holed up in the house because a gunman was loose in our neighborhood. Some guy wanted by LE the next county over had broken into an apartment a block away and stole a sawed off shot gun after an altercation with the apartment renter. The entire neighborhood and SW side of the city goes into lockdown. A police chopper lands behind my house and spends hours circling above. Roads are closed and police are everywhere. Meanwhile, I'm helpless to do anything to protect my family from where I was, so I orchestrate with my buddy to plan on his brother staying with my wife while I was gone because the thug is still at large. I wasn't panicking, I just wanted to be able to do something. This is the eighth burglary within a half mile ofnmy home in the last 1.5 months. My buddy I mentioned above lives next door to a house that was broken into one one night during the spree. We have all been on edge since then. The burglaries were pretty brazen, even carrying them out while people were home. There was a large police presence every day for two weeks afterward. One day you'd see about 5 cop cars descend in front of a house and then disappear. Jogging at dusk would get you spotlighted and questioned. I expect this, but I also commented that when the police presence abates, this stuff will rise again. We moved into our home in 2004 and our 'hood used to be considered desirable. Now its not uncommon to hear raised voices in some domestic dispute, as I listened to at midnight last Wednesday. I know this is small fries perhaps compared to what some of you have been through but for our area, this is a radical shift for us here. As I hinted at, we're just not used to this frequency of crime. I guess I have nothing useful for posting this but to just be able to vent a bit and say that the chances are far greater today than yesterday that I could become a crime statistic- in my own home. I no longer get to read about this kind of stuff happening elsewhere; it's here, literally at my doorstep (police bloodhounds actually tracked the thieves' scent right by our house). I can no longer NOT have a plan to deal with this if we are to remain in the suburbs. Our hands have been forced here by these events. As the economy deteriorates, I expect the poor living conditions and risks taken by criminals to increase. Is this going to be the lamentable, new wave of the future in suburbia? Are any of you experiencing upticks in crime where you live?

Edited by: Rear Flank Downdraft on Nov 8, 2014 - 5:06am
Sun, Apr 29, 2012 - 3:53am
Patriot Family
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No specific upticks in crime

No specific upticks in crime just yet where we live (well north of Atlanta), but we have a stubbornly high unemployment rate. I am seeing plenty of people selling off valuables at pawn shops and Craigslist. The amount of silver, gold, jewelry and firearms coming into our local pawn shops has just about doubled over the past few months. I know the employees since I'm in the shop at least once a week looking for 90% silver, and they are also seeing a shift in who is selling - more white collar folks and housewives. I don't think this is a seasonal thing - people are offloading their wedding bands. It's not a waterfall yet. Think of it as a steady stream that seems to be building.

What worries me is what happens when the unemployment runs out, and they run out of valuables to sell.

Seller of high quality, Thrive brand freeze dried storage foods: www.freezedriedpantry.com
Mon, Apr 30, 2012 - 12:57pm
treefrog
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@patriot family

"What worries me is what happens when the unemployment runs out, and they run out of valuables to sell."

do you think anybody still thinks of the classic remedy - cut way, way back on spending?

ditch the cellphones, cable, turn the lights out when you leave a room, only essential automobile use, shop goodwill for clothes - etc.

i remember when i was a college student, i got by on almost nothing. there were six of us who had a basement apartment, no phone, no a.c. i worked construction in the summers, ate a lot of beans and rice, wore second hand clothing, but i got through, and made good grades. not much partying, that takes money - that probably helped the grades. going to the library to study was free.

treefrog land and cattle co.
Tue, May 1, 2012 - 2:32pm
Patriot Family
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Treefrog - unfortunately, not

Treefrog - unfortunately, not many people can take a step backward into "college poverty" at this stage of the game. My point is they were making enough money to support their lifestyle and save a little money every month. However, most folks ignored national economic conditions as an inhibitor to finding a job and just thoiught they could pick up something. I think they are learning to live within their means now!

Glad I got a wakeup call back in 2007. People can recover financially if they put their mind to it. For us, we moved from state to state with my jobs, so mobility was a key factor in me staying employed and prepping.

The folks I'm seeing today have fewer and fewer opportunities. I feel for them. I'm in the same boat, to some extent - hunting for a job. It's the ones who will steal from others that get me worried on some level and I'm starting to see signs of desperation. Pawn shops are usually the last or second to last stop before true poverty.

Seller of high quality, Thrive brand freeze dried storage foods: www.freezedriedpantry.com
Mon, May 7, 2012 - 4:07am
Jappleseed911
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You will probably get

You will probably get responses all over the board.

My definition of suburbia is probably more close to your definition of a dense urban area (fake suburbia as we are so close to the urban core) with it's ills of an embedded poor population in adjacent 'bad' areas and crime. I live 4 miles from downtown Los Angeles in a relatively decent area that's adjacent to a very nice area. Though I live in the Los Angeles area, I HAVEN'T noticed a crime-spree or major uptick in crime in our crime statistics b/k I believe it's getting masked by everyone's pre-existing , mental construct/ active actions on security. We lock the doors b/k we're -suppose- to lock the doors. We have a home-alarm b/k we're -suppose- to have a home alarm. My significant other stays in the car (if she's parking on the street) until the shady person walks by b/k she's -suppose- to wait for shady people to leave the immediate area.

This may sound like your definition of hell but really it's not. It's an active thinking environment I suppose. This lifestyle doesn't preclude my pretty neighbor from walking her dog at night, nor the Orthopod from moving in a few doors down, nor my other neighbor from leaving his garage door open for hours. I think it's a combination of our existing police funding and 'type of policing' geared toward maintaining order in an environment like this moreover everyone is used to being somewhat vigilant. Its hard to describe....I don't feel a (constant) threat perhaps b/k I'm used to living under the sword?

This was a long-winded way of saying that I haven't noticed a significant uptick in (property & violent) crime in a area one would logically assume would appear; we already expect it so it's 'harder' to perform here. That being said, I have noticed more anecdotal accounts of person-to-person type crime. I -do- notice more shady looking people in public areas. They have a predator look in their eyes ya know?

Kind of like this: https://www.traxarmstrong.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/profileimage-as...

Very similar to this: https://ih1.redbubble.net/work.6662360.1.flat,550x550,075,f.cat-stalking...

It's a very distinct look. I once got marked by a late 40-something eastern european dude. Trailed after us about 20 feet for about a 1/2 block. Matching our pace perfectly. He had the same cat-like look in his eyes. He never stopped looking directly at us. We were in a public area and I knew he was up to no good...flushed out his intentions at a stoplight crossing when we 'stopped' instead of walking when the light turned green. His body language hesitated for a split second and he knew he was caught.

Look for the cat-like eyes. That's the mark of a real predator.

Mon, May 7, 2012 - 4:12pm (Reply to #5)
Rear Flank Downdraft
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@jappleseed.....

Very interesting take on the predatory, "cat eye" countenance.

Suffice it to say that it's imperative to adopt and maintain a kind of vigilance and observational prowess beyond that which we are normally used to.

The managed perception of an area and its crime is vitally important to the public officials. My town is home to a prestigious university and prides itself on being the "small town college, slow-growth, great place to retire." That image sells, and may be true in some areas, but I had a friend that worked for the university police department and she filled me in on the actual reported crimes, and that number and type of crime was staggering.

​The passage of time and economic changes hasten changes in the neighborhood, but I suppose I'm a bit surprised at the rapidity with which I've noticed it on my own block.

Tue, May 8, 2012 - 8:41am
Wizard
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What I have noticed

Since the weather has started to break into spring, there has been quite an up tick in break ins mainly in the out lying areas. In the smaller communities. what would be considered country to an urban area living person. Two separate incidents particularly disturbing was there were teenage girls home alone after school when the thieves broke in. The girls ended up being fine but obviously shaken. They were aware enough to hide and be quiet while it was happening.

The houses in the out lying areas are farther apart where police patrols are very seldom and there is enough distance between houses, sometimes a city block or more. Thieves will take the path of least risk of getting caught.

I am thankful I have lived the last 25 years in a small neighborhood where there is no real organized neighborhood watch but all of the neighbors know each other and are very alert to any strangers coming into the neighborhood. And phone calls are made immediately amongst each other and we just come outside and watch them. This action alone has made quite a few strangers walking down the road looking up into everyone's yards like their head is on a swivel get nervous and leave the area. And all it took was for some people to just be outside where they can be seen by would be thieves.

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