How is or Who Does Determine PM Prices?

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#1 Thu, Aug 25, 2011 - 12:31pm
John Galt
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How is or Who Does Determine PM Prices?

I have long wondered how the daily "market" price of precious metals gets determined.

In theory the laws of supply and demand apply, and the daily spot price is (allegedly) a reflection of this. But at the end of the day how does the final decision get made that silver, say, is worth $40 (US) per oz., or gold is $1700 or $1900 per oz.?

Does some secret cabal meet in the catacombs of a vineyard in France to sacrifice a virgin gerbil to the Sun God, and after divining the entrails do they then determine, and decree, what the upcoming price movements will be? Although what I just suggested may sound ludicrous, this wild ass theory if far more logical that assuming that any kind of free market forces are actually at work in the world. I'm already convinced that free markets no longer exist. Perhaps they never did.

But the question remains: if the price of gold finishes at $1745.60 at the end of the trading day today, how did that actual number get determined? And who has the final say on what that number will be?

Edited by: John Galt on Nov 8, 2014 - 5:04am
Thu, Aug 25, 2011 - 12:39pm
lilbromarky1
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Very good question.  Noone

Very good question. Noone ever talks about how price is discovered. I would hope that the closing price would be the last point during the trading day where the highest buyer bid met the lowest seller asking price. 

If its anything other than that its not a real price

Like my ideas? Check our blog at: http://backtobasicseconomics.blogspot.com/
Thu, Aug 25, 2011 - 3:02pm
sdpauly
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I thought the price was

I thought the price was determined on the COMEX (and other exchanges) by the price of futures contracts.

Similar to stock prices, the price is determined between the bid/ask and what the last transaction sold for.

I could be wrong... 

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