Modern Homesteading & Helpful Household Tips for Preppers

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diegeiro
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Modern Homesteading & Helpful Household Tips for Preppers

This forum is to share Modern Homesteading and Household Tips. While this forum may reflect some Christian values in its posts (I am a Christian) it is to welcome people of all faiths and backgrounds. It is a place to share your household, homesteading and prepping tips, so please respect one another's faiths and beliefs, including those of the Christian faith, without proselytizing your faith, in this forum. Thanks in advance for your mutual respect. I hope that we all can learn from, and share from one another here.

Edited by admin on 11/08/2014 - 06:06

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diegeiro
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How to Make Laundry Detergent

Homemade Laundry Detergent
multiple recipes

Hey Y’all, You don’t have to steal it ‘cause it’s cheap!

Original Laundry Detergent

http://www.onegoodthingbyjillee.com/2012/01/complete-photo-guide-to-making-your-own.html

and
No-Grate Laundry Detergent
for those who are too lazy to grate soap.

http://www.onegoodthingbyjillee.com/2012/04/super-fast-and-easy-homemade-laundry-detergent.html

Homemade Fabric Softener Recipes

http://www.onegoodthingbyjillee.com/2012/02/homemade-fabric-softener-finally.html

http://www.onegoodthingbyjillee.com/2011/08/giving-bounce-dryer-sheets-bounce.html

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diegeiro
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How to Make Fresh Butter and Yoghurt

How to make Butter and Yoghurt

How to Make Butter

Here is a great recipe for butter from my neck in the woods:
http://thehiveandhearth.blogspot.com/2011/03/raw-milk-butter-yogurt.html

I tried it in the food processor and it works like a charm, fresh butter in about 15 minutes. I am not sure why the rinsing is done, but I put the butter in the fridge to get it cold and used the warmer RO water. This recipe is good for any non-homogenized milk, so it doesn't have to be raw.

In fact, since raw milk is now illegal, I would presume this woman no longer makes butter this way, using only non-homogenized, yet pasteurized, milk for her butter.

There is also a recipe for yoghurt at this site:

http://thehiveandhearth.blogspot.com/2011/03/as-promised-yogurt.html

Although in this recipe she heats the milk more than you may need to, Sally Fallon of the Weston Price Society doesn't heat her raw milk to 180, just to 110 in order to not kill all the enzymes. If the milk is not raw you would heat it up to 180 degrees at this point. Both Sally Fallon and this gal from Amish country, Indiana, use a dehydrator to make their yoghurt. It looks like it would be a very good investment. It also is something that is great for drying herbs at a standard temperature. And it is quick as well. I would like one! :-)

It looks kind of expensive though.

This site has an entire section on recipes and canning, as well as another version of
Original Laundry Detergent, using a bucket

http://www.thyhandhathprovided.com/2011/10/homemade-laundry-soap-its-about-time.html

Be sure to check out
You might be a Mennonite if:
http://www.thyhandhathprovided.com/2011/05/you-might-be-mennonite-if.html

A great picture of our heartland.

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how to make a pumpkin pie without a crust

i recently harvested a good sized spring crop of cushaw squash (think green striped pumpkins with a neck).  since i have this abundance (way beyond what i expected), i have been looking for things to do with them.  i found this really easy recipe for pie.  first, cook the cushaws down into pumpkin puree.  i have lots of ziplock bags of puree in the freezer.  first peel and remove seeds, then steam them, bake them, whatever then mash and bag them up. 

incredibly easy pie recipe - makes 2 large pies.

4 cups pumpkin puree (homemade or canned :(

1 pkg cream cheese (8 oz) - warmed to soften

1 can (12 oz) evaporated milk

1 cup sugar

1 tsp vanilla

4 tsp pumpkin pie spice *

four large or six medium eggs

2 cups bisquick baking mix or other premixed bisquit mix ("jiffy" works well)

preheat oven to 350.

mix first 8 ingredients well in a large bowl

stir in bisquit mix. 

spray two large flattish ovenproof bowls with baking spray (pam, etc)

pour batter into bowls (leave 3/4 inch of space)

bake for 1 hour, 20 min, reducing heat the last 20 min.

(if you don't have large pie plates/bowls, keep an extra baking dish handy just in case you end up with enough batter for 3 pies!)

*home made pumpkin pie spice

4 parts ground cinnamon

2 parts ground nutmeg

2 parts ground ginger

1 part ground cloves

1 part ground allspice

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diegeiro
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How to make Kefir

Everything you ever needed/wanted to know about Kefir...and more!

I first printed this out in 2007 and keep it in my recipes file. I was glad to see that it was still on the net with just a few changes to its address.

http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/kefir-faq.html

Thanks for posting on the forum treefog. I hope to see you back.

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diegeiro
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Blossom End Rot in your Maters?

We just tried using Epsom salts the other day to water the garden. It is very dry and drought seems to bring on end rot, as does too much moisture.

½ c of Epsom salts per gallon water

http://suite101.com/article/prevent-garden-tomato-blossom-end-rot-with-epsom-salt-a238452

http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/load/organic/msg0506054611573.html

This is a good article below from the Latter Day Saints magazine on blossom end rot and on splitting tomatoes. It suggests using lime (dolomite) or gypsum in the bed, and adding borax if needed.

www.ldsmag.com/lds-church/article/1/5973

I am considering trying sprinkling a small amount of borax into my garden bed, but just a few tsp.  Borax is an amazing thing. It is a must have for my pantry and has multiple uses in my prepping. (See the recipe for laundry detergent). Would love to hear what others are doing with it.

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/gardening-horticulture/463315-boron.html

This is one of the worst years I have seen for end rot. Last year was bad for our tomatoes, but we had more cracked tomatoes than end rot and did not end up canning any. This year we switched to roma’s but are having more end rot. I think it might be from our required watering due to drought. The tap water from our outdoor spigot is both softened and fluoridated well water. The plants don’t really like it. My thought is that if boron can cleanse the body of fluoride it might help the plants which are not looking real good right now since we are in one of the worst areas for the drought. Even the GMO corn, which is drought resistant, is looking pathetic in the fields around where I live.

I am hoping that the magnesium and perhaps some borax will help fix the imbalance since we added some lime this spring before planting. If not there is always Tums. I sure don’t want to lose an entire crop of maters. Before we plant next year I will get a soil sample taken.

Here is another site which discussed the benefits of boron.

http://agebb.missouri.edu/hort/mvga/archives/May11/mvga5.htm

I would love to hear what other people are doing in Turdville to prevent end rot in their veggie beds.

The gal in the video below uses Tums in her container pots of tomatoes.

She also has a Neem Oil Spray recipe for aphids and bugs on plants.
 In ½ liter of water add ½ tsp dish soap (it looks to me like she added more than that), then add neem seed oil, ½ - 1 tsp. and spray lightly on plants.

She also used ½ tsp vegetable oil in her smallish looking rain barrel to keep mosquito larvae from forming.

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Laineyisat
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anyone doing anything with grey water????

In these times of drought, I am much more mindful of every drop of water that is being used - or rather not used completely! I've been digging around a bit to find out more info about recycling water from showers. washing dishes and laundry....

Is anyone ahead of the curve on this ???

If so, please share!!!!!

: )
Thanks!

Lainey

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grey water

At our bug out location, the full time residents pipe the grey water into the fruit trees. If things get real dry, we were talking about filtering the water through ponds with reeds and willows to help clean the water.

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blossom end rot

has been a real problem for us in our backyard garden for the last couple of years.

asked the local old school hardware store guy about it this year and he recommended powdered lime.  It's a very finely ground white powder, very fine indeed.  when planting peppers, tomatoes, et cetera, I'd dig the hole, drop a tbs of the lime in the hole, mix it in, then plant the seedling.  did pretty good this year so far.  I think it's a garden purposed version of this stuff: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium_hydroxide; need to check the bag and post a pic of it, worked like a champ

we also use pelletized lime in the off season, just mix it into the top 4-6 inches of soil in the raised beds.

my understanding of the issue is, physiological issue from lack of calcium uptake.  can be exacerbated by irregular watering (too much, too little) but if it's not in the soil in the first place you'll have a bad time of it.

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Don't know if this is useful

Don't know if this is useful for ay of you. Hope it may inspire :)

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120727-when-good-milk-turns-bad

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Blossom end rot

Our first food garden this year, in containers, produced the same issues, splitting tomatoes and rotting blossoms. 

Fortunately we're well connected in the horticulture dept and our sources targeted low calcium as the culprit.

I took handfuls of the calcium rock we throw to the chickens and dumped one or two in each pot of tomatoes etc. and it fixed the problem immediately.

Upon further investigation of successful gardening in our poor soils, I've discovered some interesting info.

#1 Missing minerals in the soil accounts for weak plants susceptible to infections from bugs, fungus, disease etc.

#2 Good composted soil combined with specific minerals should fix the issues.

#3 Bio-Char, a 'new' product may bind the minerals in place, along with holding water in the soil and providing an environment for beneficial microbes and bacteria.

We've prepared our soil for the next planting with compost, heavy in manure, duck weed harvested from our pond, chicken manure from the hen house, and have purchased specific garden minerals formulated for our area, and bio-char to apply once the garden goes in.

Since we've got three raised beds ready to plant each 8' x 4', I'm considering a test garden for the first year. The plan is to apply bio-char to one bed, minerals to another bed and a combination of minerals and bio-char to the third bed to compare the results.

I'm really looking forward to the the coming planting season her in Fl. I've purchased the Square Foot Gardening book and found that to be very helpful in planning the layout of the beds.

Hope this is some help to others. The temperatures and the drought have to be terrible to deal with. 

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Blossom end rot is usually

Blossom end rot is usually due to a lack of calcium and magnesium. Crush up some egg shells and place in the holes where your seeds or transplants will go. Have also started seeds in egg shells and then planted the whole thing. No blossom end rot for me this year, first time ever. Hope I didn't just jinx myself.

Neem oil works very well but I have found, here in N. Fl. that spraying needs to be done every 4 days, not each week or 2 weeks as the instructions say. Sprayed the other day and 4 hrs later the bees, wasps, butterflies, etc.  were still all over my zipper peas.

Do not use roundup anywhere near your garden. That stuff is deadly. Quit using it a couple years ago and bees, wasps, etc. have returned in droves. That shit is poison and has a helluva half life despite the claims made about it. Blessings to all.

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Diegeiro, The softened water

Diegeiro,

The softened water contains heavy amounts of salt which is not good for your garden. You need a water source that bypasses the filtering process.

diegeiro
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@Last Rebel

Thanks for replying. I know the softened water is not good, but it is pre-softened before I get it at the water filtration plant. The only way I could bypass it is by digging a well, which probably would not go over well in my suburban addition.

I am not where I feel I am supposed to be, but rather stuck in suburbia for a time. Meanwhile I am gardening, raising fruit trees, learning and applying as much as I can towards self sufficiency while waiting patiently for God's timing, which is always perfect, if only in hindsight :-). 7-8 years ago I wanted to buy a small farm and my whole family laughed at me. We bought what we have now as a temporary place intending to find a mini-farm or lake property later. Unfortunately the small farms have been gobbled up by either larger family farms who want the land and outbuildings, or corporate farms. Perhaps after this horrible summer drought there may be some available. It is hard to find one now, and the prices have gone up substantially.

The end rot seems to have fixed itself for now. And we got some decent rains, finally!

I've been dealing with ants that came out of the ground after the rain and came inside after making almost 3 lbs mozzarella.

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How to make homemade mozzarella

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-homemade-mozzarella-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-174355

This is not exactly the recipe we used, but very similar. I've picked it because it has instruction to make it without using a microwave. We used the microwave because it was our first time and did not find this instruction until after. The cheese came out well. You need to use regular whole milk, rbgh free that is not ultra pasteurized like the organic milks you find in the grocery. We used rbgh free milk from Kroger free using soon to expire wick vouchers. You can put salt in when you add the rennet (best to use liquid rennet) but the salt tends to go into the whey, so if you wait until right before heating and stretching, the salt will go directly into the cheese.

Since store bought cheese is not rbgh free, I would debate that it is worth the effort to make your own. You can do a double batch, which is what we did on the last two gallons of milk and it came out ok.

It made a bit of a protein mess which brought in ants, but I was able toeradicate them with a homemade borax, nutella and honey bait that was taken back and succeeded in poisoning the nest.

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Homemade laundry detergent-dry powder recipe

Another recipe for homemade laundry detergent. I found this earlier, but it did not tell you how much to use. I like it because it stores really easily. The liquid and dry recipes don't suds up like regular detergent, so at times I will put just a splash if liquid Free and Clear All in with the homemade and use just a bit less of the homemade.

http://www.texashomesteader.com/2010/11/01/powdered-laundry-detergent/

I haven't tried the dawn detergent laundry detergent yet. It may suds better. Using it in laundry detergent is a way to stack less things in the pantry. And Dawn dish detergent has multiple uses. Great for killing bugs.

If anyone has tried any of the detergents or has other uses for dawn detergent, please share.

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Dry Canning

Wow! Some people are really serious about storing up food!

But since I don't have the space or a sophisticated piece of machinery like that, I'll have to use mason jars.
I do have a Foodsaver, under a bed somewhere that I need to learn how to use, so this method will work best for me.

more useful information:

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