Anyone moving to the American Redoubt states?

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Patriot Family
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Anyone moving to the American Redoubt states?

I'm looking to make contact with folks who are planning to move or who have already moved to the American Redoubt states (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, eastern Oregon, and eastern Washington) specifically to enhance their prepping efforts.  We're especially interested in Idaho. 

Would love to hear your experiences on why you moved, what you would have done differently, and if the area you moved to is meeting your expectations in terms of community, availability of work, churches, etc.

I recently lost my job due to a business reorganization, and it's a blessing in disguise as I am now free to search for work in the Redoubt  states and **possibly** move my family there.  I work in the call center industry (operations/WFM) so we have a lot of flexibility.

Thanks!

Edited by admin on 11/08/2014 - 06:06

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Rico
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You should check out western

You should check out western South Dakota and the Black Hills--there is no free-er part of the United States, yet you don't have to put up with the usual wackos that populate the places you mentioned.

stephanie
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*BUMP* - re: Anyone moving to the American Redoubt states?

I'm always curious to hear where people have decided to move and why...and how it's going.

I'm in central Texas right now. I can't say it's the best place to be - there's been a drought, and it gets super hot in the summer.

But I'm glad I left Southern California. I must have saved myself from inhaling a good number of "hot particles" after Fukushima hit just from my move to Texas. 

If I weren't in Texas, I wouldn't mind being in the Pacific Northwest. My issue with the PNW is that the West Coast is particularly vulnerable right now to Fukushima fallout (and there may be another explosion if they don't get that plant under control). The Ring of Fire has also been acting up, so I'm expecting to see major quakes along the West Coast in the next 10 years or so.

But every place has its risks. You could move to Wyoming and then the Yellowstone Caldera finally blows everything to kingdom come.

I have a friend who moved to Missouri to prep. I sometimes wonder why - did he consider the possibility of the New Madrid Fault giving way in a spectacular 9.0 quake? Or was the risk worth it?

Patriot Family
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Wanted to post an update to

Wanted to post an update to this thread.  We've made plenty of contacts out in the redoubt states, and I'm planning a trip out to look around.  We're in the throes of starting a business so I've had to delay the trip for a while.

Stephanie - I guess there is always something that can happen no matter where you live!  If a volcano or EMP strike doesn't get you, a solar flare will :).  If nothing else, we can always be taxed to death!

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Fred Hayek
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If you want to avoid natural disaster the place to be is . .

A year or two back, at Slate.com, they had an article which tried to answer the question, where should you live if you want to avoid natural disasters as much as possible.    They considered hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, prolonged extreme cold, drought and probably some other factors I'm forgetting. 

Anyway, the best place in the U.S. to be to avoid natural disasters turned out to be . . (drumroll please)

central Connecticut!

Living here in central Massachusetts, I think everything that applies to them applies just as well here.

The only problem is the extremely bad government we have in both states.

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Patriot Family
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Hah - I used to live in

Hah - I used to live in Central CT!  Between the taxes, the government and restrictive firearms laws I think I'll take my chances elsewhere.  We actually REALLY liked the New England states - especially Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.  It's just a personal goal to stay out of NJ, NY and CT if at all possible because of the tax situation.  I am on the hunt for a job, so I'll take what i can get even if it means moving back to the NE USA!

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Strongsidejedi
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@patriot family

Dear Patriot Family,

Familiarity with the Pacific Coast west of the Rockies will likely suggest many different observations including issues related to water rights, energy regulation, and taxation.

I noted on google that your posting ranked very high when searching google for "American Redoubt"

I do admire the amount of prep work that the Mormon church in our area has encouraged.  The Mormon church seems to encourage independence and self-reliance to a much greater degree than other ecumenical or church based organizations.

If so many armed "preppers" are taking matters into their own hands, it could be extremely difficult to flush out these areas without a military unit moving through to seize control.

Lest a person think such things are impossible in the USA, review the story of the military engagements in Northern California in gold country where military units were dispatched from San Francisco to escort payments and gold shipments from mines to the city. 

I found an interesting story about Fort Laramie on this page: http://www.newconcordpress.com/NCP/authors/munkres/military/Laramie/Gold.html

Going back to the current day, if so many preppers are in the area, I have to think that local and state government officials in those areas will either reflect the prepping mentality or will reflect the superimposition of will on the community.

In this area of California, I was listening to XM/Sirius this afternoon.  In San Diego the interstate 805 was shut down for a while as a suicide attempt was being stopped.  All traffic on the freeway was shut down.

http://www.cbs8.com/story/18995707/man-on-i-805-overpass-sign-near-balboa-avenue-southbound-lanes-closed

If one person can shut down the interstate in a major city like San Diego with his sign sitting idiosyncratic behavior, this does not bode well for that area having sustainability in the face of disrupted social events like a riot or disaster.

Still, the hills around any metropolitan area are likely to be good areas for hiding out.

Historically, the hills are easier to secure, blend in, and view from.

I was told by a very old relative (near 100 years of age) about his prior experience in a war torn area prior to living in the United States.  He spent time as a small child (less than six years old at the time) with dirt flooring, thatched hut like dwellings, and heat from a fire in the middle of the humble abode.  He recalled that the family lived high in the hills above the plains.

They lived there because while the wars were passing by on the plains below, they could just continue to live on and none of the ground forces would disrupt their crops or humble dwelling.  The dwelling was at or near the peak and could see for miles around.  Because there was no water at the peak and very little of strategic value (other than the view), no one took interest in the site.

This gave rise to my interest in agricultural properties in Southern California.  It seems to me that TF readers might do well to follow Katie Rose's example.  IMHO, it won't matter much if you are in one zone or another.  What matters is if we start exchanging goods, services, and ideas; especially if bartered or conversely exchanged with fiat paper currencies...

Patriot Family
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Strongsidejedi wrote: This

Strongsidejedi wrote:
This gave rise to my interest in agricultural properties in Southern California.  It seems to me that TF readers might do well to follow Katie Rose's example.  IMHO, it won't matter much if you are in one zone or another.  What matters is if we start exchanging goods, services, and ideas; especially if bartered or conversely exchanged with fiat paper currencies...

Couldn't agree with you more.  We were well on our way to doing something similar to Katie Rose, although probably more on a bare bones scale with the intention of building it up over time.  Unfortunately, I lost my job and that interrupted our plans.   To date, haven't been able to find anything.   It's tough out there!  Thank God for a very generous severance package.

In the interim, we are starting up our own small company to sell supplies to outdoorsmen and preppers, since that is something we have a passion for and know well.  Although I already have favorable wholesale pricing with quite a few manufacturers, we ran into head winds when a potential partnership fell through and my job loss accelerated the timeline.  Currently waiting for the website work to be finished up so we can go live.    If it does better than expected, then we can make the move to anywhere in the country as long as I have a post office nearby and a small facility to store inventory.  At least it's something the whole family can get involved in with customer service, shipping, testing products/blog entries, ordering inventory, etc.

Anyway, we've identified several areas of the country we are interested in and I've been keeping my eyes open for positions in those states.  ID, WA, MT, OR, WY, TN (Cumberland Plateau) all top the list.  It's not just about changing up our location to meet prepping needs - it's also about getting my kids into an environment where they can experience rural or semi rural living before it's too late and they are out of the house.

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Katie Rose
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I wish I had found this earlier

First off,

You are welcome to visit me in NE WA State. Seriously. Just PM me.

I moved here because of my relationship with the Holy Spirit. One night while attending a Passover Celebration I was stunned to hear that small, sweet voice telling me to move away from the coast to higher ground. Not wanting to obey, I asked for confirmation. I got seven confirmations within three days, and stopped counting at forty four confirmations.

So I began praying over a map of the world (Caribbean, here I come!) only to experience a big, fat nothing. So I moved on to other states, still nothing. When I got to WA State the dot on one of the towns kept getting bigger and smaller, bigger and smaller. Disgusted, I pretended I didn't notice it. This kept on for two weeks.

Then my sister who was also praying blurted out, "I think we're supposed to move to XXX" I nearly up-chucked. I mean, what are the chances of two sisters getting the same little town in NE WA State, when we were praying over world maps? Neither of us had been there. We knew nothing about it.

Well this little town is filling up with Christians who were also guided to move here. I keep hearing these amazing stories of why folks have sold their homes, given up good paying jobs, and moved here. The locals think we are nuts!

That's why I am where I am. I am close to Canada and close to Idaho, in the foothills of the western Rocky Mtns.

If you are thinking about moving, I recommend you do so prayerfully. You may end up where you least expect to move. wink

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DayStar
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Wow, Katie!  That's amazing. 

Wow, Katie!  That's amazing.  About how many people have moved there?

DayStar

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Hi Katie. I'm also curious....

when folks take that leap and sell their homes and give up good paying jobs to move there, how do they make a living?   Are most of them already financially secure?  Thanks.

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