Any advice for parents

10 posts / 0 new
Last post
itchy166
itchy166's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/11/2011
Hat Tips: 1
Posts: 2
Any advice for parents

Hello all,

I am a 41 year old married male.  My wife and I are raising three children ages 16, 14, and 7.  We live in the subburbs in a fairly "well-off" neighbourhood.  I lost my job in March 2009, and was unemployed up to March of 2011.  I managed to hold onto our house (we are current and thankfully not underwater).  I lost my truck, credit cards (currently in collection), and credit rating (obviously).

Right now we are rebuilding, and trying to build up savings (all in PM's, the credit card collections can wait).  My wife also just began working.  We are doing ok, but I know that what we went through was only "round one".  

How do I prepare my children for TEOTWAWKI without crushing their spirits?  (They are all into Apple products, iphones, ipads, internet, cellphones, etc.  How do I tell them that I believe these things will all be gone in the next few decades?)

Any advice would be appreciated.  Thx

Edited by admin on 11/08/2014 - 06:06
SilverFocker
SilverFocker's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/14/2011
Hat Tips: 2577
Posts: 297
itchy166 wrote: Hello

itchy166 wrote:

Hello all,

How do I prepare my children for TEOTWAWKI without crushing their spirits?  How do I tell them that I believe these things will all be gone in the next few decades?)

Any advice would be appreciated.  Thx

You don't. I think you need to explain that the possibility exist. We really do not have a clue as to whats coming...........it could be a complete disaster, or it could be a continuing controlled slow motion fall as we have been witnessing.

Just do your best to educate your kids the best way you can without scaring the crap out of them, instill in them that things are not easy to come by and show them what you are trying to do in prepping.....let them buggers clang some silver coins. also explain it is important that they be tight lipped about what you have.........education by both parents is key.

Brotha Bob
Brotha Bob's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/15/2011
Hat Tips: 800
Posts: 179
Honesty

Honesty. You don't have to paint the darkest picture possible. But, to inform them of history when currencies collapse. Teach them basic economics. Explain why debt can be bad. Discuss the topics of today. What's going on with Italy and Greece. They will learn much if you approach it in the right fashion.

You can temper the dire outcome, which I think is inevitable, with the love of a father. Your kids will be thankful.

My daughter is almost 7. She has no idea about any of this. Hopefully, by stacking, she will be thankful I did.

__________________

May God Help Us All

But, what do I know?

Eternal Student
Eternal Student's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/14/2011
Hat Tips: 2162
Posts: 86
I'm sorry to hear about your

I'm sorry to hear about your misfortune. I'd agree with the honesty approach. Kids are far more resourceful than we older people tend to give them credit for. And they can offer surprisingly refreshing and helpful views. They can truly be an asset.

I'd also add that, with the holidays coming up, you might consider giving them each a shiny silver coin if it's within the budget. Not only does this start them young, but these are always a hit, I've found.

Maybe not as hot as an iPhone, but they are still popular. And they'll be worth more in 5 years time than todays iPhone.

Prize Fighter
Prize Fighter's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/14/2011
Hat Tips: 3349
Posts: 615
itchy166, a thoughtful

itchy166, a thoughtful question indeed.  I believe people only know what they know and what they know is everything to them.  How can it not be?  I think it would be a waste of time and possibly harmful to your relationship by trying to convince children their world view of "stuff" is at a minimum, incomplete.  Don't tell them, show them.  Present a solution without addressing it as such.  Give them an option of a different worldview.  Show them what they probably don't know or haven't considered.  Create a spark which they can kindle into their own fire of truth.  We can teach and talk but lasting and real knowledge only comes from experience.  Personal, hands-on experience.

Many times in my life, and to this day, I can understand something but I never truly learn it until I try and fail at it myself.  Sure I knew it would probably end as such, but I have this innate need to see it to it's conclusion myself.  I can only speak for myself, but perhaps a lot of us are like that.

I can say without a doubt, my childhood in Cub Scouts/Boy Scouts which gave me the chance to love of the outdoors, molded me in ways that could never be taught.  My most lasting loves and impressions were formed by nature on my own.  To this day, looking at my camping gear or remembering great trips still cannot give me the feeling that first step on the trail gives.  Theory is just that.  It takes action and all 5 senses to get the full human/nature experience.  In my opinion, this is where truths are born.

Nature, which includes us, is cyclical and it's natural state is harmony.  When something tries to operate outside of this relationship it is doomed to fail.  Don't tell them, show them without telling.  Experience it together.  Go camping, away from others and influences, do it the best way you know how, screw it up, burn the eggs, trip over the tent guy-lines, get dirt on your face, but most importanty have fun.  The lessons will be self taught.  You don't have to have all the answers.  Nature will teach in it's own way in it's own time.  Just introduce them to that option.  This is a backpack, this is a tent, this is how you cook over a fire.  Gotta start basic because we are talking absolute truths here and foundations in nature, like gold/silver, are the beginning.

Just my opinion and I didn't say exactly what I wanted but I think you get the idea and its what got me here.

Jasper Puddlemaker
Jasper Puddlemaker's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/14/2011
Hat Tips: 1879
Posts: 222
I agree -- "Don't"...

I totally agree with the don't scare them with TEOTWAWKI theories.  Let them be kids and let them enjoy this part of their lives.  Teach them sound economic principals (and useful skills), and let them enjoy life.

itchy166
itchy166's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/11/2011
Hat Tips: 1
Posts: 2
Thank you for your comments

Thanks all for your thoughtful responses.  

I agree with much of what you all are saying here, thank you.  For the sake of conversation, I will elaborate a bit on my experience and my concerns.

My kids handled the job loss very well, but it was difficult for us all.  We had one year without birthdays, and the kids were surprisingly mature in their expectations.  We were not the only family in our community affected by the recession, and some of the kids' friends families went through job loss, financial crisis, then divorce.  We were lucky.  

I do not look at our experience as all bad, far from it.  Our family is now much stronger because of our experience, and I believe that we are much more prepared for 'round two' than we would have been otherwise.  

However, it was really difficult for my teenage daughter.  It is hard enough on thirteen year old girls fitting in at school, and as shallow as it is, the difference between popular or not is often having the right shoes or the newest iphone.  My concerns sometimes become almost schizophrenic - I want the kids to fit in and be happy now, and be prepared for what is coming next as well.  Goals that are often completely opposite.  

WheelerSilver
WheelerSilver's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/17/2011
Hat Tips: 549
Posts: 113
Bug Out Plan

My wife and I have regular check-ins about how much we are willing to live without if and when the worst case scenario hit us. Here is part of our basic bug out plan: toss the droids and the pricey data plans, the sat TV, Netflix, cable, internet, organic foods, rely on wood heat only, get our asses to church every Sunday to pray for our country's sad state (oh wait... we should be doing that now!), ditch one of our cars, fall back on our physical holdings and stored food when needed, etc.

I guess what I'm saying is that every family should have a bug out plan.  

__________________

http://www.wheelersilver.com
~Handmade Fine Silver Bullion~

Perfidious Albion
Perfidious Albion's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/05/2011
Hat Tips: 2324
Posts: 692
Travel travel & more travel..

Expose them to as many different cultures and experiences you can & broaden their horizons. That way they have a depth of experience and examples of different lifestyles cultures to make informed choice's  in life..  

__________________

Humble newbie listening and learning.
A lemming doesn't last long these days..

Brotha Bob
Brotha Bob's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/15/2011
Hat Tips: 800
Posts: 179
@ Itchy

Your heart and mind are in the right place. You shall do fine. Teaching your kids and taking care of them can be two different things. The middle path is there if you look for it.

God bless and best wishes

__________________

May God Help Us All

But, what do I know?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Topic locked
Syndicate contentComments for "Any advice for parents"