canned bacon and bottled butter

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Adventures
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canned bacon and bottled butter

I have found something that is more tedious than waiting for water to boil after adding LME for beer making. It's waiting and adjusting an electric burner to get the pressure correct on a pressure canner. With the additional incentive that a canner can blow up and all the wort can do is make a mess. So off to the new adventure....
    How I canned bacon:  I got 4# of Albertson's thick sliced bacon (my favorite) and rolled some in parchment paper and a cut up brown paper bag. I wanted to see if I had a preference. Any where from 12-14 strips seemed to be a good size for a wide mouth quart canning jar. Lay out paper, bacon then paper and then folded in half. parchment paper will allow you a few more strips than the brown bag. I live at altitude so I needed 12 # pressure for 90 minutes, my stove really seem to like 13 # of pressure compare to 12 #. I'd rather be a bit overpressure than under for processing meats. Anyway 4# of bacon = 4 wide mouth quart jars. I had my little instruction guide that I referenced from start to finish to make sure I followed all the steps for safety. I also had another job to keep me in the kitchen so as not to get bored playing with the heat to keep the pressure at the correct level. Trust me you are committed to paying close attention to your canner if you want to be safe. So I bottled some more butter.
       Bottled butter the sequel: I used 1/2 pint wide mouth jars this time instead of pint reg. mouth jars for a couple of reasons. If you have use reg. jars it's hard to get at some of the product, and if we are looking at a lack of electricity a half pint of butter is used rather quickly after opening and should not spoil even without a fridge. Plus I think they may make good gifts and barter items. I prefer small amounts for those kinds of things. 5# of butter will do about 6 pint or 12 1/2 pint jars, with just a little left over. If  some of your jars don't seal, just put in the fridge and use first.
I used a combo of info for bacon, Enola Gay, and the folks at Rural Revolution for the basics on canning bacon. Kellene Bishop at www. preparednesspro.com for the bottled butter. If you want to do any of this search their websites on how and why you should do butter and bacon yourself and add it to your preparing.

Edited by admin on 11/08/2014 - 06:06
Bobbi
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This is disinformation, and that is being generous

There are no approved procedures for canning bacon or butter, and WHY would you want to?  You would be better served to instruct the folks on how to churn butter and how to cure bacon rather than offer them untested, unsafe hysterical remedies for what they think they need.

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Bobbi I'm not sure why you think it's unsafe

If you have access to a milk giving critter good on you. I don't, I've done bottled butter and used it after 6 months and it didn't kill me or make me sick. Many folks in preparedness have done the same and it seems safe. "Bog butter" was considered edible after 300-5000 years so I don't think my pasteurize canned/bottle butter is much of a threat. If you don't think it's safe don't do it. Canned bacon is mainstream and done by Yoders and I use basically the same process. My life depends on being safe as possible. If you think the FDA, USDA and corporations care about your health as much you do, well you have fun. I'll can and process my own food.  Folks can try it out or walk away all on there own.

I'm not here to be popular. I just tell folks what I've done and what works and doesn't work for me.  Everything I post is something I've done or done by someone I trust and done myself. Do it, or don't. I'm not gonna get attaboys either way. You don't need bacon or butter to survive.

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Adventures, please accept my apologies

After thinking about this for 2 days, my post was too snarky and for that I do apologize.  Tis not my place to tell others what "rules" they should follow.  If you are doing these things and they have not killed you yet, then may God continue to bless you!

By the way, I'm not here to be popular either (just ask others I've PO'd here)  and I do can myself so I hear ya.

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Bobbi wrote: After thinking

Bobbi wrote:

After thinking about this for 2 days, my post was too snarky and for that I do apologize.  Tis not my place to tell others what "rules" they should follow.  If you are doing these things and they have not killed you yet, then may God continue to bless you!

By the way, I'm not here to be popular either (just ask others I've PO'd here)  and I do can myself so I hear ya.

http://www.canned-butter.com/

Red Feather has been canning butter to the delight of Australians and New Zealanders for decades.  It's not only safe, but a product that is difficult to tell from fresh creamery butter.  I just started canning about six weeks ago, because that was the next step for me in learning new skills to prepare for an uncertain future.  People have looked at me like I'm nuts for canning potatoes something as common as potatoes...butter is next.

I volunteer twice a week at a local charity and they allow us to take home two grocery bags of food.  Many times it includes frozen ground turkey...a pretty tasteless meat and not terribly popular with any but the most fat conscious eaters.  Spice it up and make chili out of it and you never notice.  Spaghetti sauce ...same thing.  And the price is right :).

Almost anything can be safely canned if you're clean, careful and precise about processing times and temperatures.  And all those quarts of blueberry pie filling I've got (free blueberies, sugar and a bit of cornstarch) will sure be a nice bit of summer in January, especially if we get a time when shipping out of season foods from one hemisphere to another becomes impractical.  I've canned a huge beef roast, chicken breasts and tilapia.  It's all good :)

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PS  Please keep posting

PS  Please keep posting Adventures.  As someone just entering the learning/experimentation stage I would appreciate hearing anything you have to share.

It was funny that in my research I kept hearing about the "Ball Blue Book of Canning"  and of course bought one before the canner arrived.  I was sorely disappointed.  The book didn't live up to the hype.  It's great for step-by-step instruction but it doesn't explain the "whys" of it all to my satisfaction.  I've had to dig other places for some of that.  The "whys" are important to me because I often want to do things that are not specifically covered by one of the recipes and I need to understand what can be adapted and remain safe and what cannot be fudged under any circumstances.

Anyway, one of my adaptations that appears to be completely successful involves those potatoes.  The recipes all called for cooking the potatoes prior to canning but that resulted in such a mushy mess the potatoes would have not been useful for much but mashing/creaming.  I wanted something that could be drained, thrown on a cookie sheet and browned.  I got it by cold-packing.  I now have potatoes canned in firm chunks that are delicious drained, spritzed with a little olive oil and garlic and broiled.  Cook them a bit and they can be mashed as well.  Versatility :)

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A mountain tree, if it would see, the far horizon and the stars
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So Stormdancer

You just chopped up the potatoes raw and then filled the jar with water and a little canning salt, then pressure canned?  How long did you process them?

I am just learning to can too.  I have done jams and chicken.  I want to do ground meat, like for tacos, or chili.

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Maryann wrote:You just

Maryann wrote:

You just chopped up the potatoes raw and then filled the jar with water and a little canning salt, then pressure canned?  How long did you process them?

I am just learning to can too.  I have done jams and chicken.  I want to do ground meat, like for tacos, or chili.

Maryann it took three tries before I felt comfortable I had something that was both safe and versatile.  The first batch was done by the recipe in the Ball canning book.  The potatoes were too soft for my liking and it was one of my early disasters due to stupidity as well.  I failed to let the canner return to atmospheric pressure on it's own via cooling.  I took the weight off and let the pressure escape which caused much of the liquid to boil out of the jars.  They did seal, but the potatoes in the top half of the jar were not covered in liquid.  I figured out what I'd done wrong (got in a hurry and tried to rush the process) and tried a second batch.

This time I didn't cook the potatoes.  I used hot, sterilized jars out of the oven, packed them with raw potatoes and poured boiling (distilled) water (plus one teaspoon of plain salt per quart) over them leaving one inch of headspace.  I processed at ten pounds for fifty minutes, which is ten minutes longer than the processing time required by the Ball recipe.  That extra ten minutes was my own "fudge" to make up for the fact that the potatoes were not hot when they were placed in the jars.  It worked fine except that the raw potatoes absorbed some of the water and the top inch in the jars was still uncovered after processing and cooling.

The third batch was the same except that I left the potatoes about 1 1/2 inches low in the jar and then filled with water up to about 3/4 of an inch of headspace.  That allowed the potatoes to absorb a bit of the water in processing and still end up covered once it was over.

Anyway, 50 minutes at ten pounds seemed to do the trick (I'm right at sea level).  Oh, I also chose red russets to can.  Those are a bit waxier than the fluffy baking varieties and I believe remain a little firmer through the heat of processing.  I'm speculating there, but the first batch that went to mush was a mixed bag of different kinds of potatoes. 

The batch is two weeks old now and all jars are still well sealed, color has remained the same and the two jars we've eaten were delicious.  Of course I'll keep a close eye on them as time goes by since it was a "non-standard" process...but so far so good and I really think if problems were going to show up they would have by now.

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A mountain tree, if it would see, the far horizon and the stars
May never know a sheltered place, nor grow symmetrical in grace
Such trees must battle doggedly, the blasts and bear the scars. - by Marion Loyal Thompson

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Potatoes....

Thank you for the info, Storm.  We love potatoes and the regular canned ones from the store that I have stockpiled barely taste like real potatoes.  I may try your technique, thank you for the detail and let us know how it goes, would be nice if you could store them for a year or so...

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Canning and preserving all foods take some basic knowledge

Everything I recommend is stuff I tried and has worked out well.  Not that I fear for you but I'd hate to poison a small child or anyone's child. I think canning and learning to preserve your own food is a great idea. I make no money or tips if you decide to can or not.  I don't have any skin in the game to convince you this is a great idea.  I just do it and it works for me. If you are playing it safe and think factory made food is safer that's on you. I may think you are wrong but it's your money, and your body. I just want you to store food you can eat.

A great book It's called "Putting Food By" and it covers canning, freezing,  a root cellar and other stuff. Plus it tells you why folks preserved food.

Whatever works for you is the right way for you.  I've tested my preps over 2 months of not buying groceries or going shopping at all. I have learned my weak points have you? You got time to prepare why prepare to suffer? Hell you can suffer without trying. Just this week I bought up 36  big rolls of TP, 6 tubes of toothpaste and brushes, another 6 bars of deodorant/antiperspirant and 10 bars of Ivory soap.  Sure I could make soap but right now it's cheaper to buy at 30 cents a bar or less.  

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Don't worry Bobbi we've all walked on our lips at some time!

Remember who the approved sources folks are...?  I'm not sure about you but some of the approved folks are selling a product.

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BBQ Turkey Storm dancer

I did a BBQ turkey for the first time and it was great. An 11.5 pound turkey was done in about 3.5 hours.  Made some great Cajun tacos  and turkey stock with the leftovers.  I played it safe with basic spice for my first time trying out the BBQ but have some fun and I'd recommend a Cajun or curry to spice up the turkey. If you get a big bird you could easily can or freeze the leftovers.  I got a great recipe for baked southern Mac & Cheese that has gone over great and is easy to do. I'm going to try it cooked over Mesquite along with the turkey and see if the smoke will add some good flavors.

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