Food Preps

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LaMachinna
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Food Preps

Hi, everyone.  Hope you are enjoying your weekend.  Just had some much needed mild storms here in the Midwest.  Helped out our little garden greatly!  Wanted to hear your thoughts and executions re: food prep.  Pls do share as I value your ideas!  I have been a prepper for about 5 years, however, have never dipped my toe in to the freeze dried/#10 can arena.  It makes sense to me, having the extra long term storage capability, and ease of preparing.....but, I'm  also weighing that against the financial aspect of it all.  Currently, I'm torn....seeing it as insurance and a gamble all at the same time.  I can't tell you how many times I've abandoned my cart at costco w/their kit and a few other dealers.  Done lots and lots of research and have also discovered that the #10 cans are getting harder and harder to come by.  I just haven't been able to pull that trigger,  but am still stocking up on pantry items.   I am and will always be a researcher (aka "the techie" by sweet hubby) and want to make sure I'm going into decision mode fully prepared (see, a true blooded prepper instinctively!).   That's where you all, the experts come in smiley

My husband is fully on board and has come full circle enough on this aspect as well and is the one encouraging me to pull the trigger on the emergency 25+ year food schtuff's. 

Please tell me your heart and thoughts on the matter, if you would....it would be so helpful. 

Carry on Comrades, keep alert and keep preparing friends. 

Gina LaMachinna

Edited by admin on 11/08/2014 - 06:06
Bongo Jim
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Why not?

If you can afford it and have the room, why not?

Darth Smoker
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Hello, your mild storm was

Hello, your mild storm was worse in SW Minn. where I grew up. Our old barn blew down. My bro. and I were talking about how we would stack hay up to the peak. Oh, the memories! Such a monument to wealth and hard work.

Now it's a pile of rotten timber.

http://www.albertleatribune.com/2011/07/01/severe-t-storm-sweeps-southern-minnesota/

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/07/02/deadly-storms-rip-through-wis-minn/

Roy

LaMachinna
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Oh, Roy...

Man, I'm so sorry to hear about your barn!!!!!!!  frown Especially because its something of such value in so many ways.  I sure hope everyone is okay and the sting of losing something so precious to the family fades over some time.  That storm can never take away what you shared and produced for your family....that lives on forever.  Nothing can ever take that away.  Again, I'm so sorry!

CoalCracker
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#10 Cans

Don't just rely on one type of prepping - Diversify your preps by many different means.  Including the #10 cans in your preps are possibly the best type for long term storage.  I have also bought some Costco emergency food buckets but they tend to have quite a high sodium content - I like to store MRE's, bulk military ration trays, grocery store 10lb bags of rice and beans to store in sealable plastic buckets, honey/salt/sugar, grocery store canned goods for shorter term (rotational) storage as well as growing your own fruit/vegitables and canning or drying them for storage.

It is true that #10 cans are in high demand right now, I waited two months to have my Mountain House order completed.

Keep in mind w/ #10 cans:

1) Buy foods that you would want to eat.  My kids are picky and the last thing I want in an emergency situation is to open a can of food that they will not eat.

2) You will need to increase your water storage as well to compensate for the preparation of dried food.

3) Freeze Dried foods retain a little more nutritional value over Dehyrated but they tend to cost a little more.

4) Buying alot at one time may cost quite a bit - you may want to pace yourself and just start buying a case of cans per month until you get to your personal comfort zone.

Good luck with your preps

Jasper Puddlemaker
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#10s...

We have a few cases of assorted #10s stored, but it wasn't until recently that we started rotating and using them on a regular basis.  I wish it would not have taken me this long to realize that they are pretty cost effective, primarily because there is no waste (only use what you need).  So far I am using potato flakes, eggs, cheese powder, milk, assorted vegetables, and assorted fruits in recipes that we would normally call for  fresh or canned.  Some are freeze dried, others are dehydrated.  I am going to increase my stocks because they are so useful for everyday use.

T1000
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organic food storage

If you're into organic foods, you can get some long-term food storage from this site: http://www.storableorganics.com/

I haven't bought from them personally, but it's from the people at http://www.naturalnews.com, which is a great site.

As long as you're going to eat the food, if you can get the long-term food supplies now, I think it's going to be a great investment. If the food is packed correctly, it should last for decades.

Eric Original
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Good thread Gina

I'll stay in touch.

Eric

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For those of you who are

For those of you who are unaware, the LDS (Mormons) are big on home food storage.  They recommend every family store a year's worth of food, just in case.  They operate canneries across the country to help families meet their storage needs.

They are open to the general public, you don't have to be a member.  Each week there is an "open canning" day (Wednesday around here), where you can show up and can foods.  They have a warehouse full of bulk commodities in bags, empty #10 cans, oxygen absorbers, canning equipment, the whole 9 yards.  It is a communal effort.  Everyone turns in a list of what they want in terms of #10 cans, and you are assigned a task (sealing, filling, etc).  Everyone works until the orders are complete.  At the end everyone has their sealed #10 cans, labeled and packed in boxes.  You just pay up and haul the food away.

They have a huge variety of food staples.  Wheat, beans, rice, sugar, powdered milk, pastas, oats, dried carrots/apples/onions/potatoes.  Etc etc.  The prices are a FRACTION of what you'd pay online for mountain house.  For example, $8 for a #10 can of powdered milk (vs $20+ online).  You also have the satisfaction of having packed your food (and other's food).  Somehow it is more satisfying than getting a package in the mail.

It takes a morning or afternoon of work, but you can build up your food storage needs for not much money.  All of the staple foods are 25+ year shelf life.  For more oddball items you might have to go with mountain house, but you can buy the vast majority of what you need. essentially all of your staples, through the LDS.

http://www.providentliving.org/

You can also google search for LDS canneries to find one near you.

Everyone there is extremely friendly, you aren't pressured to join or anything, and you'll meet lots of other "prepper" types to network with if you like.

Eternal Student
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Be careful with your money

LaMachinna: IMO, a 25 year supply is a complete waste of money for most people. Buying a whole ton of food at once is recognized by many as one of the top mistakes that people make. The risk is that when you need it, it has either gone bad, or you don't have what's needed to use it.

For example, many of the canned supplies have a limited shelf life, which degrades as the heat increases. 100+ degrees can shorten that down to, say, a couple of years. Unless you have a cool cellar (60 degrees or so), many types of food just aren't going to last.

It's far, far better to integrate your preps with your daily food. That way you are not only constantly cycling it, but you are prepared to use it as well. When it's needed, you're good to go.

Also, watch out for things like flour, corn bread mix, and anything already ground up. Such materials start decaying as soon as they've been ground. Flour is especially bad, since you can't really taste that the oils have gone rancid (and are bad for you).

A year's supply, integrated into your daily meals, should be plenty. You don't have to last forever; you just have to outlast the ones who aren't prepped. :)

I speak from some experience on this. When I first started prepping years ago, I bought enough food to last 3 months, for earthquake supplies mostly. I made the mistake of keeping it in the garage, as well as buying corn meal and flour. All of it went bad within years. The corn meal cans had pressure inside build up and popped the tops.

Now I buy wheat berries, and have a grinder. I also make my own bread and pasta. HTH.

Mr. Picklepants
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Store your #10 cans in your

Store your #10 cans in your crawl space under your house instead of a garage. First put a temperature guage under there to see how hot it is. Mine hovered in the low 70's even in the summer. I put them in a plastic tote, and buried them halfway. Garage's are very hot places.

I have also stored white rice like this with no problems. I use canning mason jars with oxygen absorbers. In my case it's actually cooler under the house.

bern
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Resources

I recently got the bug to start prepping for long term food storage.  Here are some resources that I found in my searches:

Long Term Food Storage Video (Part 1 of 3): 

Food Storage Life Info:  http://www.tribwatch.com/artStorageLife.htm

Equipment Supplies:

http://www.amazon.com/

http://www.usaemergencysupply.com/

http://www.lifesaverusaonline.com/

http://www.beprepared.com/

http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/  (phg)

Grains / Beans:

http://www.bulkwholefoods.com/ (best online prices [including shipping to my area] for most organic products)

phg  (good prices on some items - some organic foods)

http://www.aaoobfoods.com/

Surprisingly, the Whole Foods Market brick and mortar store in town is very competitive with the best prices I could find online for bulk organic grains/beans.  YMMV.

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Eric Original
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phg

Pleasant Hill Grain is also the best place I know of to buy canned bacon.  Just sayin....  yes

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LaMachinna
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Thanks so much all....

for the informative posts, canned bacon wink and all!  Keep on preppin' friends. 

Thanks again, LaMachinna

pourty
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What kind of grinder do you

What kind of grinder do you use?  I have a grinder for wheat which can be hand-cranked or attached to a bicycle or something, the problem is that the flour it makes is rather coarse and not much good for traditional baking (unless you're just making flapjacks).

Would be nice to find a manual grinder which can make decent flour...

Eternal Student wrote:

LaMachinna: IMO, a 25 year supply is a complete waste of money for most people. Buying a whole ton of food at once is recognized by many as one of the top mistakes that people make. The risk is that when you need it, it has either gone bad, or you don't have what's needed to use it.

For example, many of the canned supplies have a limited shelf life, which degrades as the heat increases. 100+ degrees can shorten that down to, say, a couple of years. Unless you have a cool cellar (60 degrees or so), many types of food just aren't going to last.

It's far, far better to integrate your preps with your daily food. That way you are not only constantly cycling it, but you are prepared to use it as well. When it's needed, you're good to go.

Also, watch out for things like flour, corn bread mix, and anything already ground up. Such materials start decaying as soon as they've been ground. Flour is especially bad, since you can't really taste that the oils have gone rancid (and are bad for you).

A year's supply, integrated into your daily meals, should be plenty. You don't have to last forever; you just have to outlast the ones who aren't prepped. :)

I speak from some experience on this. When I first started prepping years ago, I bought enough food to last 3 months, for earthquake supplies mostly. I made the mistake of keeping it in the garage, as well as buying corn meal and flour. All of it went bad within years. The corn meal cans had pressure inside build up and popped the tops.

Now I buy wheat berries, and have a grinder. I also make my own bread and pasta. HTH.

bern
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I've ordered, but not used

I've ordered, but not used yet, the Country Living Grain Mill:

http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/country_living_mill.aspx

It supposedly can be adjusted from coarse to fine.  It had very good reviews on amazon and other places, so I'm hopeful that it will work as advertised.

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Dr Durden
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I think on of the best

I think one of the best multi-purpose kitchen tools is an Omega 8005 juicer. It will juice everything from delicate wheat grass to hard root vegetables. It spins at like 80 rpm and uses and auger to slowly crush food as to not destroy nutrients with heat.

The thing has been a life saver for me. I've made all kinds of nut butters (peanut, almond, cashew, pecan) with it. Made a ton of baby food for my son with it. I prep my ground beef jerkey for pemmican with it. Just the other day I ran a few lbs of cooked chicken liver and Italian sausage through it to make pate. 

They go for about $250 but you get a lot of use of it. I've had mine for 6-7 years and it's still going strong.

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question
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Grain Mill

The Wondermill Jr. works great  for grain milling. Can use stone (for grains) or steel (for nuts) cutters and can vary from fine to coarse flour. Hand cranked but can hook up to mechanical turning. Hand cranking works fine.

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