Not-so-happy Tuesday

Just some wild-eyed speculation here so proceed at your own risk.

Recall first the concept of "Happy Tuesday". The idea behind it is this: After a week of downside manipulation, The Cartels attempt to "cover their tracks" ahead of the CoT survey each Tuesday. The Cartel short-covering (buying) on Tuesdays would often lead to UP days, thus the term "Happy Tuesday". Pondering this yesterday, I came up with the idea that today would be a DOWN day. Why? The opposite effect, actually. The short squeeze in gold of late last week was likely initiated by new longs being added by The Cartel and their buddies. Yesterday and today, in order to "cover their tracks" and not make this week's CoT appear even more bullish, selling ensues. Ring the register, book some profits and paint the CoT, all in one move.

It looks like we have seen just that overnight and this morning. In fact, there even appears to have been some brazen attempts to jam price lower and back down through the 10-day MA. It didn't work...so far...but that doesn't mean they won't try again, especially after the London PM fix at 10:00 am EDT. It's the area around 1575 that they might be shooting for so let's watch that number closely later today.

Speaking of the squeeze last week, we can finally draw some conclusions now that the OI numbers are in. Remember that the gold OI on Thursday expanded by a whopping 17,000 contracts on the initial $38 move. This was exciting as it showed new LONG interest entering the pit. However, on the extension of Friday when price rose another $17, total OI contracted by 4,300. This is short covering. So, a bottom is made and a rally begins with the 17,000 new contracts but the bounce ends with short covering, NOT more buying. After yesterday's action, we are now in a bit of a tug-of-war zone, loosely banded by 1560 and 1605 and I expect this to continue for a little while.

The silver action was even less inspiring than gold. While price rose $1.52 on Thursday and Friday, the total open interest fell from 113,663 to 112,914. This tells us that some new longs were added but even more shorts were covered. No new liquidity bothered to show up and this is a continuance of the trend that began post-MFG. There simply isn't any, regular interest in trading silver. All that remains in the pit are Cartel monkeys and HFT algos. For this reason, it's still very hard to get excited about the short-term prospects of paper silver. Price once again found a floor under $27 and that's a good thing. However, where is the enthusiasm and liquidity necessary to drive it substantially higher? FOR NOW, it's just not there. Like gold, I see a rangebound trade for a little while, banded by 27.50 on the low end and 29.50 on the high end.

Now, please don't misunderstand what I'm telling you here. I'm still extremely excited about where the metals are headed, particularly silver. The ranges I've described above are for the short term, maybe the next week or two and into early June.

Here are some news items that merit your attention and discussion. First, ZH did a little forensic investigation and uncovered some rather interesting info. In summary, it looks like the Rob Kirby estimate of $18B in losses for JPM might be a little low. http://www.zerohedge.com/news/did-fed-just-give-us-very-big-clue-just-how-big-jpms-cio-loss-may-be

Here's a post from Gene Arensberg that seems to confirm what I've been saying for weeks regarding the CoTs: http://www.gotgoldreport.com/2012/05/cftc-managed-money-short-positioning-high-for-gold-silver-.html

Egon von Greyerz has gotten some bad pub recently because he's begun to give price predictions to KWN. (Bad idea, Egon. Remember, rarely/never give date and price in the same sentencewink). Regardless, the guy is knows his stuff and he is one of my favorite gold "commentors". I want to draw your attention to something else he told Eric King yesterday. This idea that, even in Switzerland, your gold is not really your gold, is something about which I've heard anecdotally before. Well, here it is again. Smoke or actual fire??

"Von Greyerz also told KWN that a major Swiss bank did not have a substantial amount of allocated gold which they claimed to possess for their client: “We are stressing to investors to take their gold out of the banking system, not only because there are runs on banks that will continue, but the risk of being in the banking system is major.  So you should take the additional step of not just owning physical gold, but also owning it outside of the banking system.
We (just) had an example of a client moving a substantial amount (of gold) from a Swiss bank to our vaults, and we found out the bank didn’t have the gold.  This was supposed to be allocated gold, but the bank didn’t have it.  We didn’t understand why there was a delay (in our vaults receiving the gold), but eventually we found out why there was a delay (the bank didn’t have the gold).  It’s absolutely amazing, but not surprising.
This confirms what I’ve always thought.  Not only should you not have gold in banks or even unallocated gold, but even allocated gold.  It seems that some banks don’t even possess that.  So the risk of having gold in the banking system is major.”

Full text found here: http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2012/5/21_Greyerz_-_Customer_Shocked_Allocated_Gold_Not_in_Swiss_Bank.html

Finally, some serious homework for you. IF YOU HAVE TIME, please utilize it to read these two essays/presentations from Alasdair Macleod. This material was presented last week at the Sprott Hard Assets Investment Conference in NYC. The first "lecture" was primarily focused upon economics and the root causes (Keynesianism) of our current predicament. ( http://financeandeconomics.org/Articles%20archive/2012.05%20Economic%20speech.pdf). The second lecture focused primarily upon gold and silver and their role in the future. ( http://financeandeconomics.org/Articles%20archive/The%20gold%20bullion%20market.pdf) Again, there is a metric ton of information here but, if you take your time, you'll learn a lot.

That's all for now. Have a fun day. TF

334 Comments

Dr G's picture

Xty, Turd doesn't address the

Xty, Turd doesn't address the Eurozone situation much. It's largely the reason why we have the USD heading towards 82. The instability is simply devastating to the Euro. 

Long term I believe Greece leaving is Euro positive, however in the short term it will renew talk of Spain and Italy and others leaving, so the flight WILL be to the dollar. That's all it has been to thus far, so why would that change?

What we don't know is if Greece actually will leave. We also don't know if formal QE here will occur prior to any leaving. That would change things a bit. 

Not bickering has nothing to do with not posting rational and logical thoughts. 

Bought 100 Maples @ $30.15 and very happy!

Monedas's picture

Monedas is 67 as of May 22 !

Our little Mayflower Monedas !   Chisel that date on your chest, Pilgrim !  In lieu of gifts....please donate up the Turd and give me credit in the comments section !        Monedas   1929      Comedy Jihad Expanding Universe Tour   devil   PS:  I'm not like Liberal MCs at charity events who  feel they are donating their talent !  Liberals....some of the cheapest MFers out there with their own money !

Groaner's picture

Well that action SUCKS

NO they are not running to gold and silver

BUDDHA PRINCESS's picture

US Dollar May Pull Back

US Dollar May Pull Back After Breaking Out of Seven-Month Congestion

S&P 500 – Prices stalled ahead of resistance at 1322.10, the 23.6% Fibonacci retracement, with a Doji candlestick pointing to indecision. Initial support lines up at 1310.00, the 14.6% Fib, with a break below that exposing the May 21 low at 1290.30. Importantly, the Bullish Engulfing candle pattern identified yesterdayremains valid, leaving the possibility of upward resumption still on the table. A break above resistance clears the way for a test of the 38.2% retracement at 1341.70.

US_Dollar_May_Pull_Back_After_Breaking_Out_of_Seven-Month_Congestion_body_Picture_5.png, US Dollar May Pull Back After Breaking Out of Seven-Month Congestion

Daily Chart - Created Using FXCM Marketscope 2.0

​Commodities Tumble Along with Stocks Before EU Leaders Summit

Commodities are sinking in early European hours as risk appetite evaporates ahead of today’s EU leaders’ summit. Traders are pondering an endgame to the latest debt crisis flare-up that may include Greece’s exit from the Eurozone, an unprecedented outcome with no clear-cut benchmark for its implications for the financial markets. Sentiment-driven crude oil and copper prices are following shares lower while gold andsilver face de-facto selling pressure as the rout stokes safe-haven inflows into the US Dollar.

The EU sit-down is being billed as an “informal” working dinner. German officials were busy taking to the wires yesterday to pour cold water on expectations for what may emerge at its conclusion. A statement on Greece, the issuance of joint Eurobonds or any specific policy decisions in general are – according to German sources cited across the spectrum of newswires – not to be. That has left traders understandably jittery about what will in fact be accomplished.

If the German public line is taken at face value, the conversation will center on the European Investment Bank (EIB) and how it can be used more effectively to boost growth, presumably without compromising deficit-reduction efforts. If that is indeed the case, disappointed selling seems likely to descend upon the spectrum of risky assets.S&P 500 stock index futures are pointing decidedly lower, hinting current trends have scope to carry forward, though the weighty event risk ahead means things can change very rapidly in the coming hours.

WTI Crude Oil (NY Close): $91.85 // -1.01 // -1.09%

Follow-through failed to materialize after prices completed a Bullish Engulfing candlestick pattern yesterday and took out resistance at 92.51, a former support marked by the December 16 low. Crude has now slipped back below that level, exposing horizontal pivot support at 90.49 once again. Still, the Bullish Engulfing remains valid absent a daily close beneath its low at 90.90, leaving the door open for a rebound. A break back through 92.51 targets the February 2 low at 95.41.

US_Dollar_May_Pull_Back_After_Breaking_Out_of_Seven-Month_Congestion_body_Picture_6.png, US Dollar May Pull Back After Breaking Out of Seven-Month Congestion

Daily Chart - Created Using FXCM Marketscope 2.0

Spot Gold (NY Close): $1568.50 // -24.57 // -1.54%

Prices recoiled from resistance marked by the 1600/oz figure as well as the 50% Fibonacci retracement level at 1599.17, taking out support at 1582.10 marked by the 38.2% level and exposing the next downside objective at 1560.98. A break below this boundary exposes the 1522.50-1532.45 area. The 1582.10 level is once again acting as resistance.

US_Dollar_May_Pull_Back_After_Breaking_Out_of_Seven-Month_Congestion_body_Picture_7.png, US Dollar May Pull Back After Breaking Out of Seven-Month Congestion

Daily Chart - Created Using FXCM Marketscope 2.0

Spot Silver (NY Close): $28.18 // -0.29 // -1.00%

Prices are reversing lower from resistance at 28.70, with sellers once again aiming to challenge support at support at 27.06. A break lower exposes the 26.05-15 area. Alternatively, a reversal back through resistance on a daily closing basis targets the next upside barrier at 28.70.

Commodities_Tumble_Along_with_Stocks_Before_EU_Leaders_Summit_body_Picture_5.png, Commodities Tumble Along with Stocks Before EU Leaders Summit

Daily Chart - Created Using FXCM Marketscope 2.0

US DOLLAR – Prices soared through resistance in the 10134-41 area marked by the 76.4% Fibonacci expansion and the October 2011 swing high, exposing the 100% level at 10241 as the next upside objective. The move marks a major tone shift from the congestion defining prices for nearly six months. However, early signs of negative RSI divergence warn that a pullback may materialize before the rally continues. The 10134-41 region is now recast as near-term support.

US_Dollar_May_Pull_Back_After_Breaking_Out_of_Seven-Month_Congestion_body_Picture_8.png, US Dollar May Pull Back After Breaking Out of Seven-Month Congestion

Daily Chart - Created Using FXCM Marketscope 2.0

COMEX E-Mini Copper (NY Close): $3.488 // -0.014 // -0.40%

Prices are testing through support at 3.438, the 100%Fibonacci expansion, with a break below that exposing the 123.6% level at 3.327. Near-term resistance lines up at 3.537, the 76.4% expansion level.

Commodities_Tumble_Along_with_Stocks_Before_EU_Leaders_Summit_body_Picture_6.png, Commodities Tumble Along with Stocks Before EU Leaders Summit

--- Written by Ilya Spivak, Currency Strategist for Dailyfx.com

Titus Andronicus's picture

Watch out for the DX

I've posted this before, but I'll post it again.

Watch the DX!  If the DX goes over 82 by any margin, gold and silver are going to tank pretty hard.

The DX touched a 20 month high last night and the entire commodity complex freaked out.  It pulled back, but keep an eye out.

This is going to be like a Sword of Damocles hanging over the head of gold and silver until the DX either pulls back or breaks out.

proton777's picture

But...

Won't European QE be dollar positive, and thus, metals negative?  Anyone?

Xty's picture

re euro flight positive for dollar

Dr G - capitalizing will does not make your point.  The flight has not all been to the dollar - the Euro has been in serious trouble, as has the USD, for a long time.  Hence the rise in the 'price' of gold vs all major currencies over the past 10 years.  And silver hasn't been to shabby over that decade either.  Short term thinking is fine if today you want to trade your slv for faceplant, but not if you are thinking years, or possibly months, given the speed with which the chaos will descend.

Turning off caps lock will help with the bickering - advice for everyone.  Shouting usually means you are insecure in your position, and is a form of intimidation.

Groaner's picture

The FED is backing the IMF..

so it will effect all fiat currencies whey they print again. and again

BUDDHA PRINCESS's picture

Yen Soars as BOJ Holds Back on Stimulus

EU Summit Now in Focus

The Japanese Yen soared against its top counterparts in overnight trade, adding as much as 0.7 percent on average, after the Bank of Japan opted to keep all the elements of its monetary policy regime unchanged. Traders were expecting to see Maasaki Shirakawa and company expand stimulus as the BOJ attempts to meet its inflation target of 1 percent, which would require doubling the rate of price growth recorded as of March.

The BOJ announcement compounded existing sentiment-driven upward pressure on the Japanese unit as Asian stocks sank, driving capital into the haven currency. The rout likely reflects jitters ahead of today’s EU leader’s summit as traders ponder an endgame to the latest debt crisis flare-up that may include Greece’s exit from the Eurozone. Not surprisingly, the stocks-linkedAustralian and New Zealand Dollars bore the brunt of risk aversion in the FX space.

The EU sit-down is being billed as an “informal” working dinner. German officials were busy taking to the wires yesterday to pour cold water on expectations for what may emerge at its conclusion. A statement on Greece, the issuance of joint Eurobonds or any specific policy decisions in general are – according to German sources cited across the spectrum of newswires – not to be. That has left traders understandably confused as to what will in fact be said.

If the German public line is taken at face value, the conversation will center on the European Investment Bank (EIB) and how it can be used more effectively to boost growth, presumably without compromising deficit-reduction efforts. If that is indeed the case, disappointed selling seems likely to descend upon the Euro and spectrum of risky assets at large. S&P 500 stock index futures point to a decidedly dour mood across financial markets, trading down 0.5 percent ahead of the opening bell in Europe.

Elsewhere on the calendar, minutes from this month’s Bank of England rate decision seem unlikely to generate significant fireworks from price action after hawkish overtones that seemingly emerged at the April sit-down were swiftly scattered with last week’s quarterly Inflation Report. Yesterday’s soft CPI print also helped on this front, muting the shock value of a dovish outcome while arguing forcefully against a hawkish one.

Asia Session: What Happened

GMT

CCY

EVENT

ACT

EXP

PREV

23:50

JPY

Merchandise Trade Balance Total (¥) (APR)

-520.3B

-470.8B

-84.5B

23:50

JPY

Adj. Merchandise Trade Balance (¥) (APR)

-480.2B

-617.2B

-616.6B

23:50

JPY

Merchandise Trade Exports (YoY) (APR)

7.9%

11.8%

5.9%

23:50

JPY

Merchandise Trade Imports (YoY) (APR)

8.0%

10.1%

10.6%

0:00

AUD

Conference Board Leading Index (MAR)

0.2%

-

0.0%

0:30

AUD

Westpac Leading Index (MoM) (MAR)

0.4%

-

0.0% (R-)

1:00

AUD

DEWR Internet Skilled Vacancies (MoM) (APR)

-0.8%

-

-0.5% (R-)

2:37

JPY

Bank of Japan Rate Decision

0.10%

0.10%

0.10%

Euro Session: What to Expect

GMT

CCY

EVENT

EXP

PREV

IMPACT

8:00

EUR

Italy Consumer Confidence Index (MAY)

89.5

89.0

Low

8:00

EUR

Euro-Zone Current Account n.s.a. (€) (MAR)

-

-5.9B

Low

8:00

EUR

Euro-Zone Current Account s.a. (€) (MAR)

-

-1.3B

Low

8:30

GBP

Retail Sales ex Auto Fuel (MoM) (APR)

-0.7%

1.5%

Medium

8:30

GBP

Retail Sales ex Auto Fuel (YoY) (APR)

0.7%

2.8%

Medium

8:30

GBP

Retail Sales w/Auto Fuel (MoM) (APR)

-0.8%

1.8%

Medium

8:30

GBP

Retail Sales w/Auto Fuel (YoY) (APR)

1.0%

3.3%

Medium

8:30

GBP

Bank of England Minutes

-

-

High

10:00

GBP

CBI Trends Total Orders (MAY)

-11

-8

Low

10:00

GBP

CBI Trends Selling Prices (MAY)

5

7

Low

17:00

EUR

EU Leaders Hold Summit in Brussels

-

-

High

Critical Levels

CCY

SUPPORT

RESISTANCE

EURUSD

1.2559

1.2783

GBPUSD

1.5678

1.5826

--- Written by Ilya Spivak, Currency Strategist for Dailyfx.com

 
BUDDHA PRINCESS's picture

The CME's Daily Delivery Report

The CME's Daily Delivery Report showed that 44 gold and 21 silver contracts were posted for delivery tomorrow. The link to the Issuers and Stoppers Report is here.

There was a big withdrawal from GLD yesterday...to the tune of 563,024 troy ounces. GLD is now back to the inventory level it held on January 26th. There were no reported changes in SLV.

Over at Switzerland's Zürcher Kantonalbank they reported updates for their gold and silver ETFs as of May 21, 2012...and there weren't any big changes. Their gold ETF had a withdrawal of only 820 troy ounces...and their silver ETF reported no change at all from the prior report on May 15th.

And there was no sales report from the U.S. Mint.

And, for whatever reason, the CME did not update the Comex-approved depositories' inventory level for silver on Monday.

Here's a chart that Washington state reader S.A. sent me yesterday...and its contents are pretty much self-explanatory.

By Ed Steer, Gold & Silver Daily
John Galt's picture

Looking at the Big Picture

In late 2008 the paper investing world as we know it looked to be coming to an end. In that environment it would have seemed logical to moved out of paper currency and into physical PMs. Defying what should have been conventional wisdom the $US rose, while PM prices fell.

Today, looking at what is happening with Greece and the Euro it seems that the turmoil and rumors now serve multiple purposes well. For starters, it keeps masses of people invested in $US by encouraging them to buy the growing debt pile as some kind of perverse safe haven play.

Meanwhile the falling Euro serves Germany and their export market well too. Germany already dominates the intra-Euro market by forcing less competitive nations to compete mano-a-mano on a fixed exchange rate. Stirring the turmoil pot over Greece, Italy, Spain or any other factor to drive down the Euro can only be putting a smile on Merkel's face.

Of course, the Bernank is also thrilled because "investors" are buying up $US faster than he can print.

Perhaps George Orwell's propaganda slogan from his book "1984" can be rephased as follows:

War is Peace; Freedom is Slavery; Ignorance is Strength; Paper is Safe.

BUDDHA PRINCESS's picture

JPMorgan Employees Sue Jamie Dimon, Ina Drew Over Losses

Add it to the growing list of people going after JPMorgan Chase. Employees are suing the bank over the $2 billion trading loss that they say hurt their retirement plans.

A lawsuit filed on behalf of JPMorgan employees says their retirement accounts fell in value after news broke about the trading loss, Reuters reports. That’s because the plan holds JPMorgan shares which have dropped 18% since the loss was announced on May 10.

The complaint, filed in U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York, names the bank, its CEO and chairman Jamie Dimon as well as former CIO Ina Drew, who resigned soon after the loss was revealed, as defendants. According to the suit, the defendants violated the federal Employee Retirement Income Security Act which gives plan participants the right to sue for breaches of fiduciary duty.

This isn’t the first suit for JPM related to its now infamous trading loss which has yet to be unwound.JPMorgan investors filed lawsuits last week against the bank’s executives saying they made “materially false and misleading statements and omissions” during the bank’s April 13 earnings call. From that suit:

Posted on the  Forbes website

The link is here.

Groaner's picture

Another losing trade.. they win.

I lose

Chepo's picture

Hey Turd, you got my support!

Fully agree with you Turd, in limiting comments posting for some time since the site was becoming similar to other sites that I don't want to even mention, where people incur in senseless arguing and attack each other for nothing, messing up with the site original purpose.

ClinkinKY's picture

Monedas is 67 as of May 22 !

Happy belated birthday you OF! (That means old friend, honest)wink

Urban Roman's picture

Here's a recent snapshot

To illustrate the way the dollar and euro are related.

Dollar Euro

Note that one graph is pretty much the inverse of the other.

Of course, there's some of that between the metals and currencies too, but currently (as documented by SRSrocco) the muppets' attention is being distracted away from the metals.

Harald's picture

It doesn't matter

The DX is an index measured against other fiat currencies, all of which are being devalued as we speak.  Who can say what any fiat currency is actually worth, right now, this very minute.  A strong dollar or a rise in interest rates would be the worst thing that could happen as far as TPTB are concerned.  The Euro has gotten a lead in the race to the bottom but Bernanke will catch up.  Nobody can devalue like the Bernanke.  That's why I buy gold instead of just keeping dollars in a savings account.

BUDDHA PRINCESS's picture

Heist of the century: Wall Street's role in the financial crisis

Wall Street bankers could have averted the global financial crisis, so why didn't they? In this exclusive extract from his book Inside Job, Charles Ferguson argues that they should be prosecuted.

It is no exaggeration to say that since the 1980s, much of the global financial sector has become criminalised, creating an industry culture that tolerates or even encourages systematic fraud. The behaviour that caused the mortgage bubble and financial crisis of 2008 was a natural outcome and continuation of this pattern, rather than some kind of economic accident.

This behaviour is criminal. We are talking about deliberate concealment of financial transactions that aided terrorism, nuclear weapons proliferation and large-scale tax evasion; assisting in major financial frauds and in concealment of criminal assets; and committing frauds that substantially worsened the worst financial bubbles and crises since the Depression.

And yet none of this conduct has been punished in any significant way.

Total fines on the banks for their role in the Enron fraud, the internet bubble, violation of sanctions against countries including Iran and money-laundering activities appear to be far less than 1% of financial sector profits and bonuses during the same period.

There have been very few prosecutions and no criminal convictions of large US financial institutions or their senior executives. Where individuals not linked to major banks have committed similar offences, they have been treated far more harshly.

Total fines on the banks for their role in the Enron fraud, the internet bubble, violation of sanctions against countries including Iran and money-laundering activities appear to be far less than 1% of financial sector profits and bonuses during the same period.

Posted on The guardian.co.uk website

The link is here.

proton777's picture

I am shocked...

and I dont know why.

EBR Mod 0's picture

YOUR SITE

Turd;

Thank you for the site and THANK YOU for bouncing inappropriate and in unrelated comments. For all the other sites OT, I like a site that has a value system. So thanks for all you do Turd. smiley

Big Buffalo's picture

Gold oz

Wow....1 oz gold coins officially available for under $1600. A 15 handle for 1 oz gold coins!

BUDDHA PRINCESS's picture

European Central Bank secretly distributes infinite money

There has been no official announcement. No terms or conditions have been disclosed. But Greece's banking system is being propped up by an estimated E100 billion or so of emergency liquidity provided by the country's central bank -- approved secretly by the European Central Bank in Frankfurt. If Greece were to leave the eurozone, the immediate cause might be an ECB decision to pull the plug.

Extensive use of "emergency liquidity assistance" (ELA) to help banks in the weakest economies has been one of the less-noticed features of the eurozone crisis. Separate from normal supplies of liquidity and meant originally as a temporary facility for national authorities to use when banks hit problems, ELA proved a lifesaver for the financial system Ireland and is now even more so in Greece. As such, it has given the ECB -- which has ultimate control over the facility -- considerable power to determine countries' fates.

This story was in the Financial Times of London yesterday...and is posted in the clear in this GATA release. It's a must read...and the link is here.

Harald's picture

Buying stock in the company you work for.

I always thought that any company that would hire me was totally screwed up.

"I'd never belong to a club that would have me as a member."  Groucho.

Teach's picture

Unbelievable...

Somebody must be dumping a lot of gold.  Is this because big money is looking for liquidity?  I always expected a big drop just before the bottom fell out of everything else.  Is this it?  I still am not selling.  Nothing has changed in the way "business as usual" works or in the fundamentals for precious metals, and until it does, my faith in PM's will remain unassailable.  Maybe in a year or two....  On another note....SHEEEIT!!  And on another note....LAST!!!smiley

Groaner's picture

82.06 usd

not good  Cartel must be having an orgasim 

onealpha's picture

Something is wrong with my

Something is wrong with my netdania app.  There is a big red spike going straight down but it isnt going back up? Wow, just wow.

boatman's picture

greece

they'll print to keep greece or print to save their OWN banks.........german and french.

the former accomplishes both things.

santa agrees.

ivars's picture

New thread

is.

proton777's picture

USDX

blew clean through 82. Wow.  82.25 now

Tube's picture

FB/Ag cross

Doesn't look like it will happen today...

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