Guest Post: "Did The Fed Signal The Inevitability Of The Next Banking System Collapse?", by Dave Kranzler

An absolute must read from our friend, "Denver" Dave Kranzler.

Here's the link to the original post at Dave's site:

Did The Fed Signal The Inevitability Of The Next Banking System Collapse?

by, Dave Kranzler

Like a Mafia Don protecting his “family,” the Fed is implementing another layer of “protection” from collapse for the Too Big To Fail Banks. This latest deal will prevent bank counter-parties from pulling collateral from a collapsing bank.  The installation of this law is a warning signal that the global banking system is  barreling toward another devastating financial collapse.

The cover story for this scheme is that it will prevent another “Lehman” event from taking down the entire financial system.  But it wasn’t Lehman, per se, that caused the 2008 collapse.  Bear Stearns lit the fuse, Lehman was selectively thrown into the explosives mix and AIG/Goldman sprayed napalm into the explosion.

My source for this information of this is this article from Bloomberg:  More Fed Protection For Big Banks.  I had to read the article carefully a few times to fill-in between the lines, as Bloomberg kept referencing the new rule as a “proposal” and either white-washed or misrepresented the facts.

The new rule will prevent the TBTF bank counter-parties from taking their collateral away from the bank when the bank is collapsing.  When a fund enters into a derivatives trade mushroomcloud1with a bank the fund is required to put up collateral, generally in the form of Treasuries.  The bank is then free to hypothecate that collateral, or make use of it for its own purpose.  But if the bank collapses and the fund is in a “winning” position on its derivatives trade with the bank, it’s in the fund’s best interest to withdraw its collateral.  The new Fed rule will prevent this.  The rule extends beyond derivatives, to securities lending agreements and repo transactions. But the truth is that this Fed rule is aimed squarely at derivatives.

The implementation of this new regulation, at best, extends the bail-in concept to TBTF “big boy” counter-parties, like hedge funds, insurance companies and pensions.  The ROFLMAOwellspring for this new banking rule is the Financial Standards Board, a key policy arm of the BIS.  The FSB is the entity that drafted the bail-in regulation, which has been largely implemented in Europe.  Bail-in regulations are now methodically being installed in the U.S. banking system.

In its essence, this “collateral freeze” regulation will eventually morph into a de facto bail-in mechanism and serves the purpose of transferring wealth from the banks’ counter-parties to the banks.  At the very least, this collateral freeze regulation adds yet another layer of moral hazard into the banking system, as banks are incentivized to underwrite even riskier derivatives transactions with knowledge that the risk of collapse is further minimized.

Interestingly, this new law is “asymmetrical.” If the bank fails, it gets to keep all counter-party collateral locked-up.   But if the bank’s counter-party fails, that counter-party has no ability to freeze the collateral it put up with the bank. The bank has possession of that collateral.  This is what happened in the MF Global collapse, where JP Morgan seized all of MF Global’s collateral, at the detriment of MF Global’s customers.  At the time JPM’s move was illegal but the judicial system looked the other way.

While the funds doing derivatives business with these banks will suffer irreconcilable damage from the new rule, at the end of the day, it will be the investors who have their money with hedge funds, insurance companies and pension funds that will bear the greatest expense of this de facto bail-in law.  That would be you, the public.  Once again the public gets screwed by the financial system in a way that is being enabled by the Government.


The only way to protect yourself from this is to remove as much of your wealth from financial custodians as possible.  Not only is the new regulation a clear warning bell of another financial collapse coming, the Fed and the Government are making it even easier to trap your wealth.   The financial system is one giant roach motel – you can check-in but eventually your money will never check-out.


Angry Chef's picture


Can we interpret this any other way ?

AIJ's picture

So Trump picks a Goldman guy

Ohhhh that's gota what he does, not what he says......Why not pick Ted Cruz's wife?

So hows that top down reform working for ya......

I like this quote from BaBabouy below the article....

"VAMPIRE SQUID ... Strikes AGAIN..."

Angry Chef's picture

Trump Picks Goldman Guy

Hmmmm........sounds like the Hegelian Dialect at work....again, and again, and again, and again.

AIJ's picture

Angry Chef

You got it.  I've had the sneaky suspicion that Trump was nothing more than an attempt to keep interest in the existing party structure at any cost.  With out his "Lighting Rod" approach, there would have been no interest at all, something TPTB could not have.   It will be interesting to see what happens next.

Royal Flush's picture

all the same...

what a shock - rofl.

none of the above!

cliff 567's picture

please build a TRUMP forum

I have great interest in knowing the bent of mind of why you like him or why you don't.

I know zero about life outside of the one that I have lived.

Mr. Fix's picture

Nobody for president

Don't you guys get it yet?

The system is hopelessly corrupt, in fact, the entire idea of having certain people who call themselves government rule by force over the rest of us, is pure evil.

Govern yourself! Why am I the only one here that knows  that human beings were designed by our Creator to be sovereign and self-governing.

Figure that out, then the made-for-TV shit show won't matter in the least.

In the end, we'll just have another parasitic oligarch, just like all the ones before.

Yeah, the face might change, but the agenda will remain the same.

Supporting this system is just contributing to your own enslavement.

Get out now, and liberate yourself.

Turd Ferguson's picture

That's not my job


Just go to the forums and start one. It's very easy to do.

dryam's picture

"Safest" brokerage?

I'm curious about what brokerage firms/banks people on this site use, and which ones seem to be the "safest" to use (if there is such a thing)?

My freakin work retirement account is with JPMorgan, and I have no choice about that but at least I can buy whatever stocks I want.

Turd Ferguson's picture

Audio from earlier

Dyna mo hum's picture


The Goldman guy is also a Soros guy. 

J Siefert's picture

Just got up

...and had my first coffee.smiley
It's Friday just before 6 am here.

PS: Hey AC! Good one, but it's Dialectic wink

boomstick's picture

@Mr. Fix

Great in theory, but the reality is You Will Be Made To Care.

Mr. Fix's picture

@ boomstick

You might be underestimating just how stubborn I am, as well as committed to doing the right thing.

I apply my theories to my life on a daily basis, and as a result, often live and love like there's no tomorrow.

My morality is nonnegotiable.

If voting ever matters at all, it will simply be made illegal in our current system. The results are always predetermined.

There will come a day when they can't keep up the charade anymore, but until then, following politics is a waste of my time.

Life is short, I choose to focus on things that matter.

Mr. Fix's picture

Chart porn....

[Most Recent Gold Prices]Smile everyone, the shenanigans will come to an end soon. devil

Nick Elway's picture

Scottrade seems better to me

Dryam, Scottrade seems better to me than Schwab, TDAmeritrade, or ETrade.  

Of the four, Scottrade was the only one  to go the extra mile to help me get my stocks into direct registration or certificate form without overcharging me. 

The branch manager at the time said Scottrade was safer (and willing to help me get stocks in my name) because they had no trading desk for their own account.  I have not verified this (and no broker is really safe anyway) but it seems reasonable. (Don't expect experience at Scottrade..they seem to have a lot of turnover and grey hair in that office!)


AngryCitizen's picture

Anybody Know What To Do With Federal Pension?

Anyone have any idea how to deal with a federal pension 10 years before retirement? Not many good choices that I can see....

Any advice is appreciated.

“I wish it need not have happened in my time," said Frodo.

"So do I," said Gandalf, "and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

AlienEyes's picture

@ AngryCitizen

The short answer is :

Spend it, and as quickly as possible. I think there is no need to tell you where to spend it.

Disclaimer :

Be advised that I don't know Jack sh!t....except that the employer that's paying you is devaluing what they are paying you with like a bat out of hell.

AngryCitizen's picture

Fed Pension- AE


How do you spend a retirement that you can't touch yet? (Not retired for another 10-15 yrs.)

I thought about borrowing as much as possible, but I'm pretty sure I can only borrow what I put in, not the 5% match. If I can't come up with anything better, I will probably do this.

Any more ideas?

“I wish it need not have happened in my time," said Frodo.

"So do I," said Gandalf, "and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

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