Rational Minds Prevail

As hoped for, rational minds prevailed in the overnight trade and gold has been pushed to a new, all-time high near 1644. Apparently, guaranteeing a 20% increase in the U.S. national debt over the next two years is sufficient reason to buy more gold. Really? Ya think?

And don't think it's going to stop there. Predictably, all The Regime and The Republocrats did was buy time. The debt ceiling is unlikely to be reached again until after the 2012 elections and there will be no pesky, evil, mean scary spending cuts until after the election, too. (If ever!) As you continue to prepare yourself for the economic chaos that lies ahead, keep the metaphoric image of the "coin drop game" in your head. The process of moving toward the end of the great keynesian experiment quickens exponentially with the compounding of interest and declining tax revenues. The "coin" dropped further down into the funnel yesterday and is spinning faster today. Continue to prepare. I don't know when the end is coming, I just know that it is.

Alright. I want to give you a couple of charts but then I want to spend some time talking about silver. First up, here's a 12-hour POSX. Note that The Pig probed the low end of its current range last week. Having held, it's likely headed now back toward the middle of the range and will oscillate there for a while.

paper_8-2ampig.jpg

This gold chart is fascinating. Rarely do you see the blatant actions of The Cartel all on display within one, little 2-hour chart but here it is. Having done their job by keeping gold in check all last week, they'll soon fall back and find a new line to defend. Looking at the action this morning, it looks like they already are. I've said for weeks that I was looking for 1650 as a short-term goal and it looks like we might get there as soon as later today. We'll see. Either way, gold is cooking and should be bought and held. As you know, I have an intermediate target of 1800 by Halloween or so. Right now, even that looks conservative but I'm sticking with it.

paper_8-2amgold.jpg

Speaking of goals, for the past several weeks, I've been looking for silver to trade to 42-42.50. All of my charts tell me it's headed there. Fundamentally, however, it's having one hell of a time pulling it off. Why?

The criminal element of the CME/COMEX/CARTEL really did a number on silver back in early May and it is going to take quite a bit more time to recover. Several limiting factors are now in play:

1) Psychological Damage. The Master Plan of the Sunday Night Massacre followed by all the margin hikes sufficiently spooked a lot of speculators. Also, since it is patently obvious that the CFTC is utterly worthless and unable/unwilling to prevent the C/C/C from pulling the same stunt any time of their choosing, money is reluctant to get back into the game.

2) Financial Damage. The manipulation of the silver Comex is designed to scare off investors. The rational person (which I'm not) will choose not to play and invest in a market where the deck is so obviously stacked against you. The events of May have scared off a lot of rational investors.

3) Margin Damage. After five hikes in nine days, the amount of money it takes to buy silver on the Comex is now considerably higher than it was back in the spring. Why trade silver when you can get twice as much leverage in something else?

All of this is combining to restrain silver by keeping a lid on open interest. The total open interest is slowly creeping up but not fast enough to sustain rallies and push rapidly higher. Buyers come in and drive the price higher but, since there is rarely any follow-through buying, the EE simply steps in once things have quieted down. They begin selling their newly-minted paper silver and back down goes price.

paper_8-2amsilv3.jpg

So, what does this mean? HellifIknow! I still think silver is headed to a short-term top near 42. From there, I expect some consolidation for a week or two or three before taking a stab at 45. The key is the open interest and that is a two-sided deal. Right now, the open interest is only about 119,000 contracts. This is good because it has a lot of room to grow and it will be difficult for the EE to create a significant selloff with silver primarily in "strong hands". 119,000 is bad because it shows a continued lack of buying interest in silver. If you're wondering, the open interest in late April was between 145,000 and 150,000 contracts. That 20% difference is the primary reason silver is $40 and not $50. Let's watch the OI numbers this month. With a little more time and data, we should be able to make some end-of-year price predictions by about Labor Day.

For today, silver is holding above $40 as I have a last of 40.15. Closing above $40 would be a good thing to root for today. Closing above 40.60 would be our next target as we wait for silver to finally generate enough momentum to go tackle the highs of last week and, eventually, the 42-42.50 we've been waiting for.

paper_8-2amsilv.jpg

That's all for now. Have a fun and happy Tuesday! TF

p.s. I posted this note and then proceeded to check my inbox. Look what I found! A new Sprott Update!

The Real Banking Crisis

By Eric Sprott & David Baker

Although the adjacent questionnaire is facetious, it does ask the right questions. If you’re a wealthy European depositor today, what do you do with your money? Do you really continue to keep cash in a Greek or Italian bank account?

survey_new.jpg

European bank depositors all face a tough decision today – to withdraw their deposits, or not withdraw and take their chances. Their response to that decision may determine the financial future of the Eurozone. Since 2008, EU Government bailouts have transformed a traditional banking crisis into a full-blown sovereign crisis. The European Central Bank (ECB) has managed to keep the Eurozone banking system going for now, but the constant threat of depositor bank runs makes its future extremely uncertain. A bank run on deposits forces banks to liquidate assets to raise cash. Governments and central banks will go to extreme lengths to avert such a scenario, because a liquidation reveals what an asset is really worth – and they are likely worth far less than what the banks are claiming they’re worth on their balance sheets today.

Bank runs have wreaked havoc in Europe over the past three years. In Iceland, it was a UK-led bank run on its second largest bank, Landsbanki, in early October 2008 that led Landsbanki to block over 300,000 UK depositors from accessing their accounts in its online bank called Icesave. Fear of widespread deposit losses compelled the British government to promptly freeze the assets of Landsbanki in retaliation, inciting an effective lock-down of foreign capital in and out of the country.1 You certainly didn’t want to have an Icelandic chequing account when that happened – especially considering that the Icelandic Krona proceeded to lose 58% of its value by the end of November 2008.2

In Ireland, it was the withdrawal of almost €4 billion in deposits in less than three weeks that compelled the Irish government to nationalize Anglo Irish Bank in January 2009.3 Large depositors lost faith in the Irish government’s bank account guarantee and began to pull their cash out of Irish banks in droves. As a Trinity College Dublin professor was quoted at the time, "This is a nightmare scenario for the [Irish] government… they can’t stop further withdrawals from the bank unless we close the borders and turn into Cuba."4

Ireland experienced a second bank run in late 2010, when more than €67 billion was withdrawn from Ireland-based institutions in October alone.5 Ireland’s top six domestic banks, two of which are currently in the process of being shut down, have now lost more than €90 billion in corporate deposits since the crisis began in 2008.6 And the withdrawals continue – in May 2011 it was reported that Irish resident private-sector deposits had declined by 8.7% over the past 12 months.7 Private sector deposits from non-Irish Eurozone residents declined by 9.7% over the same period, while deposits from non-Eurozone residents were reportedly down 28.2%.8Ireland’s experience makes it fairly clear: when depositors sense danger, and they are free to move their money elsewhere – they typically do.

The Irish deposit withdrawals have left Ireland’s banks in the hands of the ECB, which graciously bailed the country out back in November 2010, and has now lent Irish banks more than €103 billion as of the end of June 2011.9 This, in addition to the €55.7 billion the Irish banks have received from their own central bank, is amazingly still not enough to recapitalize the Irish banking system, which at the time of writing still requires an additional €24 billion of capital to remain solvent.10

In Greece, bank withdrawals have proven equally as damaging. Greek banks have seen deposit outflows of around 8% thus far in 2011, with an acceleration of outflows in May and June. Moody’s recently warned that such flows could cause a "severe cash shortage if they rapidly increased beyond 35% of deposits".11 Last week’s €109 billion bail-out suggests that may have already happened.

Just as with Ireland, the ECB has kept the Greek banks afloat, funding them almost €100 billion in 2010 and an additional €103 billion thus far in 2011.12,13 The recent bail-out will buy Greece time, but deposit outflows could still derail the ECB’s efforts to save the Greek banking system if they continue unchecked.

Although we don’t have the data for Spain or Italy, it does not escape us that those countries’ governments are likely highly aware of the effect a bank run could potentially have on their fiscal stability. Italy is a much bigger fish than Ireland or Greece. Its €1.8 trillion of borrowing in nominal terms is more than the debt of Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland, combined.14 Italy and Spain are too big to fail and too big to bail-out, so the future of the Eurozone will be seriously compromised if Italian and Spanish depositors take flight with their euros. To that effect, we found it very instructive to read about new provisions that the Eurozone’s rescue fund, the EFSF, recently incorporated into the latest Greek bail-out. Included among them is the ability for the EFSF to buy sovereign bonds in the secondary market, give EU states "precautionary credit lines" before they are shut out of credit market, and "lend governments money to recapitalize their banks".15 The sovereign crisis, at its root, is still a banking crisis. The banks hold loads of Eurozone sovereign debt. If depositors withdraw capital, those banks must sell some of those sovereign bonds to stay solvent. The EFSF provisions are there to provide the banks with the liquidity they need to survive deposit withdrawals. The question now is what will happen if the EFSF runs out of the funds to do so.

In our view, the depositors that chose to transfer their money out of their local Eurozone banks deserve some recognition, because they ‘get it’. The EU banks are still the root of this problem, and depositors are right to question the security of their deposits held with them. We have always postulated that the real problem in our financial system is too much leverage in the banking system. We are continually reminded of this fact every Friday when US bank failures are released. When you compare the failed banks’ assets to the cost the FDIC pays to make their depositors whole, it reveals how many times the banks have lost their equity capital. The key to remember here is that banks lend out our money and keep very little in reserve. If we assume they keep 5 cents of capital for every 95 cents they loan out – a 25% ‘implied write-down’ in Chart A would mean that the bank has effectively lost its capital six times over.

chart_A.jpg

The banking situation in Europe is no different from that above – EU banks are also highly levered, but their situation is further complicated by the fact that what was once the most liquid and secure loan on European banks’ balance sheets – sovereign debt – is no longer liquid and secure. This makes EU banks extremely vulnerable to deposit withdrawals as it forces them to approach the ECB for help to maintain liquidity. There is only so much the ECB can do – if a true ‘liquidity event’ takes place, we can all rest assured that there will be no buyers of distressed assets in the sizes that European banks hold today, sovereign bonds, or not.

We discuss the EU banking crisis this month to remind everyone that we have very recently lived through two instances where the entire financial system almost collapsed. The first took place during the height of the 2008 crash. The second transpired in May 2010 when the ECB stepped in with its $1 trillion bailout package to avert disaster. All financial bailouts up to this point have been instigated with a desire to avert the first domino from falling. They have been instituted to avert contagion – a total financial meltdown that would effectively turn the global banking system into an Icelandic money trap – where no money can get in, or out.

We still don’t know if a financial collapse can be averted in Europe because investors and depositors are not all naïve to reality. The financial malfunction is ongoing and will not be prevented through these continual perverse financial machinations. If Eurozone depositors move their capital – more bailouts will be required, thereby increasing the sovereign debt levels and exacerbating the seemingly hopeless situation that much more.

As the questionnaire above suggests, we believe a growing number of European depositors are transferring their money out of EU banks, and many of them are reinvesting their capital into gold and silver for safety. It does not surprise us to see gold hitting all-time highs in euros and dollars. It’s worthwhile to acknowledge that those investors in Iceland and Ireland who had the foresight to convert their cash to gold before their countries’ respective bank runs have all fared extremely well in both nominal and real terms. We believe that gold and silver are the ultimate alternative for a chequing account in a vulnerable banking jurisdiction, and whether the ECB prints more euros or eventually defaults, both outcomes will continue to support a robust demand for precious metals as an alternative currency.

For more information about Sprott Asset Management’s investment insights and 
award-winning investment capabilities, please visit www.sprott.com.

210 Comments

Dr G's picture

Great post, Turd. Thanks for

Great post, Turd. Thanks for helping us keep the faith and stay on course. I love the new intraday high for gold. Let's get a strong close and keep moving up. I'd love to see more money flow into Ag as well.

And now for some of today's very important headlines, brought to us from our favorite MSM source, CNN.com:

"Blame Fabio if your romance fails"

"Wrestler's 'flying squirrel' move wins

"My advice? Be nice to your brain"

These are, of course, on the front page as usual. Gotta keep the sheeple occupied with important stuff. Oh, and I hear that The Bachlorette finale was last night. Now THAT is news!

SilverTree's picture

,

,

stoneeh's picture

Thanks for contributing

Thanks for contributing SilverTree.

- Markus

SilverTree's picture

over now

¤'s picture

Thanks TF for the Sprott article

Had to repost this as it was almost last before the new thread.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

@shill...thanks...i think.  Scary thoughts there.

It doesn't take much of a imagination to play some scenario's out that might happen if the SHTF.

The role of the F'ed (up) Reserve as our Central Bank is about to increase dramatically imo as this whole thing disintegrates around us and them. History shows that tyrants of all types will desperately try to stay in power even if it's obvious the kingdom has burned down all around them.  I think they'll do anything to string this out. We ain't see nothing yet!

IDK about anybody else, but when a man like Putin starts talking like he is (albeit for a Prez. election) about our historic role and the POSX  becoming a Medusa for everyone else then I think he should be paid attention to as a indication how PO'd and worried the BRIC and everyone else is.

The global stress over our POSX and our Pol.'s is starting to cause friction and gain traction. We can't see it  (dollar death/destruction) and feel it like they do across the planet as we are living in the "normalcy" of the POSX being our currency and it's been that way forever. The other side looks at it as totally effecting eevrything about their way off life everyday and it's been doing so since post WWII. You think were tired of the shenanigan's? Imagine them and their worry/consternation. They're plotting about what to do, and when, regarding the USD. That's pretty much what all of us here are doing presently.

IMO the Putin/Obama relationship is going to be severely tested if (OMG!) OBummer gets elected and so does Putin. Not looking forward to that at all.

Advantage Putin and I hate to have to think or type thatno

If I'm Putin, (and I'm the ultra-nationalist and KGB type guy that he is) I'm looking at the opportunity to restore Russia's prestige at the expense of their old cold war foe. He see's an opportunity coming to dethrone the USD and our prestige the way Russia's was post WWII. The way the U.S. talked a bunch of crap about Reagan and Star Wars bankrupting the USSR  since the 90's has to have stuck in his craw and a lot of other Ultra-nationalist Kremlin types.

This is their chance to inflict some damage and they'll do so. If you were Putin, wouldn't you think similarly?

exiledbear's picture

But what you should keep in mind about silver

Is that every surviving player in the silver market is that much stronger that they were before. Sorta the way antibiotics work - they don't kill all the germs and the remaining germs get a resistance factor. They hike margins often enough, they'll breed a virulent strain of speculator that can't be shaken by anything.

They know this, they're not going to risk doing that. Even so, the hands that are left post-May are that much tougher than before for them to manipulate.

What I don't get, is why didn't they hit the gold margins at all? Riddle me that, Batman.

llaettner's picture

When is this going to end, ask the Swiss. . .

When the SNB can no longer tolerate dollar weakness against the Swiss Franc is my guess, seems like much of the PM strength is tied to USD/CHF, of all of the currencies left with a pair of nads, this is the one that will stand in the new world of money, we'll all be spending Francs before we buy twinkies with gold or silver. . . that's my guess.

stoneeh's picture

exiledbear

Re-post from the end of last thread, pretty much exactly down the line of thinking of your post:

"We're getting close to Santas $1650 which would finally silence the endless trolls who have dogged us for years. Then the assault on $1800 by year end. Some are thinking and talking $2000. That would be an amazing event to behold. Silver is going way past $50 if that happens."

I'd like to state this again - silver is much much more bullish at this point in time than gold. Don't judge gold and silver by their current performance. Remember that silver was brutally attacked since May with 5 margin increases and huge outflows from SLV, and gold was virtually allowed a free pass (no margin increases but actually a margin decrease a few weeks ago). This is more bullish for silver than gold because the CME as part of the EE has less possibility to hike margins in the future for silver, but in gold this is still very much a threat. Also silver is still in backwardation on the COMEX, and on the LBMA it is at least again in backwardation for 12 months out. Gold might look better right now but the bullish underpinnings of silver are much much stronger right now and I think it is safe to say that silver will strongly outperform gold medium term (the timeframe around the next 12 months). Not to say gold is a bad investment, gold is still a great investment and will of course also continue to rise.

- Markus

atlee's picture

GSR

GSR out to 41. Worst in this run up from $18 oz was 45. Best, back in May was 32. Conclusion, Silver is overdue. BIG up move on horizon for silver as gold continues to make new highs.

GLTA

LaMachinna's picture

Thanks Gubmint

for rescuing us!  Things all better now.

SRV - ES339's picture

Friday Jobs Report

Thanks for the PM update Turd,

Any idea why PMs have held so well through the resolution of the debt ceiling fiasco?

Looking for a hit Thursday night leading up to the Jobs Report, and have some cash on the side for a silver buy on the dip... what do you think?

Thanks!

Vypuero's picture

Question for TF or others in the know

When TF speaks of "closing above $40" or any value, does he mean the pit close (which is 1:30 I believe?) or the overall market close for the day?  (4:30 I believe?).

Also - does anyone have a timeline of when all the various markets open/close?  I remember seeing this here before but failed to save/bookmark it.  It was very useful.

After the Storm's picture

Riddle Me This Turd and Co.

Why is open interest for Sept gold over 9000? This is unusual. Active months being August, October, and December usually Sept is much more quiet. Usually when August liquidates(in July), this liquidation causes the punctuation on the summer sell off. But, usually when traders liquidate August they move into either October or December. This year heavily December....but also over 9000 into Sept. Very unusual.

In riding the gold bull this decade there are a few guys I correspond with as we try to ride this beast. A couple were around in the 70's gold bull. These guys, to be clear, do not believe in manipulation, or comex defaults, or any of the "conspiracy" stuff talked about regularly here. But the open interest of Sept has them scratching their head. Wondering. The conclusion is that someone might want delivery. If that is the case it would be significant. In my opinion very significant. Someone wanting their gold now, Sept.

Maybe some traders just opened positions in Sept because of the debt ceiling issues. Maybe they will roll on into Dec. or cash out. But unusual they didn't use Oct. or Dec. But, maybe someone wants the real stuff. It has us watching to see. Have you heard anyone mention this? Is it more normal than we think? Do you have any opinion on this?

Thanks All  

Eman Laer's picture

Peter Schiff just said

Schiff was interviewed recently and said that he believes Obama is in for a surprise because Schiff believes this debt ceiling increase will not be enough to cover our borrowing through the 2012 elections. 

Bay of Pigs's picture

Sprott

I hate to be a dick (and sometimes I am), but this kind of analysis from Sprott is bulletproof, IMO. That is why I flame the likes of KidD and OFlanagan. Nothing personal, I just think they are just wrong about him, his company and his motives. I've followed his outfit for over ten years, and they know exactly what they're talking about. People in Canada respect the guy and for a very good reason. He's made them a shit pot of money the last decade.

Bank Runs Bitchez.

Monedas's picture

Viper ?

Are those "market time bars" at the bottom of the Kitco black, live charts useful ? The Greenwich time is a little faint, though ! Monedas 2011 Talent on loan from Satan !

¤'s picture

Silver: Newton's First Law of Motion

John Nyaradi's ETF Edge Archives | Email alerts

Aug. 2, 2011, 10:32 a.m. EDT

White hot silver

Commentary: Using Newton’s first law of motion to spot winners

By John Nyaradi

BEND, Ore. (MarketWatch) — Newton’s first law of motion states that the velocity of a body remains constant unless the body is acted upon by an external force. In the arena of exchange-traded funds, sectors and ETFs with strong momentum can often continue on strong trajectories, and July’s “sector of the month” was silver, as the white metal has been white hot.

Precious metals, and silver, in particular, were the leading sector in July in response to the debt ceiling crisis and a “flight for safety” from a potential U.S. default.

Up some 18% for July and approximately 29% year to date, the white metal, sometimes referred to as “poor man’s gold,” has put in an impressive performance in spite of the precipitous decline it experienced earlier this spring.

While gold gets most of the press, it’s up “only” 14% so far for 2011, and so silver has really offered “margined” returns compared to a similar investment in gold.

Many factors have propelled silver on this upward trajectory including uncertainty over the deficit ceiling... (con't.)

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/white-hot-silver-2011-08-02

Bay of Pigs's picture

@after the storm

If your friends don't believe in manipulation of these corrupted bankster dominated markets, they are blind fools.

WTF? What the hell are they looking at? I mean really, are they serious?

SilverTree's picture

Up-ski

chart?stock_id=1482&width=550&height=375

robreke's picture

Playing Devil's advocate - please poke holes in it.

I own physical.  In fact, bought some more this week.  But I guess you could call me a cynical investor....and anytime I come across something that seems to logically make sense in opposition to the position I have already taken....I do consider it instead of blindly accepting the pre-held position that I'm right no matter what, damn it.

So, here are some counter points I've come across in research as to why we're NOT going to have hyperinflation and the US Dollar is not going to collapse.  I submit:

1.  The vast majority of the printed money from the QEs is still being held by the banks.  The currency has not reached consumers....so, much of this printed money is not making it out into the economy.   The banks are most likely using this cash to make risk free profits by buying US Treasuries.   It is a fact that bank lending is down quite substantially when compared to previous recessions and depressions.  So, consumers not being able to spend money out in the economy will keep hyper inflation from happening.

2.  China, the largest holder of US debt wants to keep rates low so US consumers will continue to buy their exports.

3.  China has no choice but to hold on to US debt due to their substantial trade surpluses.

Here is a link if you'd like to see more counterpoints to the "here comes hyperinflation and gold is going to the moon" theme:        http://www.avaresearch.com/article_details-826.html

Please make comments on these points or this article as I would love some holes poked in these facts or other comments.

ROB

Vypuero's picture

They are useful

I forgot about those.  I stopped using the kitco charts I use the forexpros ones instead, but yeah thanks.

OC15's picture

Gold

is Pwning

robreke's picture

Playing Devil's advocate # 2

Another point I forgot to include that goes against a dollar collapse is the fact of the US. Dollar - oil Link.   the Saudis and OPEC have agreed since the 70s that Oil can only be bought and sold using US Dollars.  So, as long as this dollar - oil link is in tact, the US dollar will safely be the reserve currency of the world.  Another added layer of safety for US. Money.

pbreed's picture

Fiat for dummys...

I bought a set of  6 Zimbabwe bills  for $9.99  on Ebay.  1 dollar,1 Billion,5 billion,10 Trillion,50 Trillion,100 Trillion. I've been using them for education:

I show the 1 dollar to people and tell them that when the Zimbabwe dollar was created it was worth 1.47 U.S.

I then say but the government needed  money so they started  borrowing running up big debts they could not pay.

So they printed money to pay their debts.

Then I show the 5B, ....100T bill.

Then I lay a $1 green back on top the Zimbabwe 1 $ and ask them what the difference is between these sheets of paper?

Responses I've gotten:

"But that's not real money like the dollar bill."

Uneasy smile and a worried look.

"The U.S. dollar is backed by the worlds most powerful military"

After the Storm's picture

@ Bay of Pigs

I have tried to tell them. The beat down of silver in May was overwhelming. I was just saying that these guys don't look for "issues" and they see something. Gives it more legitimacy I think. And they are very sharp guys........just old school.

Best

treefrog's picture

re: schiff comment above

"Schiff was interviewed recently and said that he believes Obama is in for a surprise because Schiff believes this debt ceiling increase will not be enough to cover our borrowing through the 2012 elections."

i have wondered about this possibility.  obummer and his crew tend to minimize the cumulative effects of inflation in their projections.   if, as seems almost certain, the debt limit increase proves to be an impetus to further inflation, this will raise the politicians' "burn rate." and they may just find themselves facing "the government's first* default" about this time next year just as the campaign for the 2012 elections is approaching fever pitch.      ....OOPS!

of course, the sensible thing for them to do, if they do recognize this risk, would be to reduce spending and thus cut the "burn rate."  reduce spending?  politicians?  riiiight!

*there is some question as to whether this would be the "first" default.  other obvious candidates are:

a)  treasury  stops redeeming gold certificates in gold (1933)

b)  treasury stops redeeming silver certificates in silver (late 1960's)

c)  nixon stops international redemption of dollars in gold  (1971)

Iowegian's picture

@ Turd

Turd - The countless posts, your insights, your market timing, the site creation, your personality, etc.  I REALLY appreciate you, man!

Just a mild rebuke, though.  I believe you are a bit too hung up on the CME margin hikes on Silver.  Yeah - Blythe and the EE exude a lot of control.  In retrospect they used the TIMING of the margin hikes to their greatest advantage to pummel the price of Silver.  Their timing was no coincidence, either.  They used the period just ahead of the summer doldrums and continued using them until the intended effect was done. 

However, they take the sell side of the bullion contracts, and frankly, that is how they make money.  Yes - they are manipulative.  Yes - they are greedy.  No - I do not believe that FDIC (publicly subsidized cost of funds) related bullion banks have ANY business being remotely involved in commodity trades.  Yes - I do believe that Gold and Silver are money. Nevertheless, the EE is not going away anytime soon.  So, the manipulations will continue.  They know how to play the game and they do it well.

Personally, I do not have that great of a problem with the margin hikes.  Its just the timing of the hikes that really reeks. Back in January of 2009 when the price was approximately $11/oz., it took $6,400 to maintain a contract of 5,000 oz.  That represented around 12% of margin.  Today, the maintenance requirement is $16,000 per oz. with the price approximately $40 per oz.  This represents a margin requirement around 8% which is actually lower than it was on a percentage basis before the hikes began:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/10/silver-margins-idUSN109799720110510

Since the pummeling we have recovered almost one-half of the price drop back.  Its only August and I believe that Silver is going to absolutely explode during the second half of the year despite the best of the EE.  My guess is that $50/oz. will not contain Silver's price as we assault it for third time.

Lastly, its important to keep these prices in perspective.  We are told that investor purchases of Silver exceed purchases of Gold by most coin shops.  China is encouraging its citizens to purchase Silver and they are doing so.  By many accounts there are likely in the area of 2 Billion oz. 's of above ground Silver. 2 Bil. x $40/oz. equals a total of $80 Billion of above ground Silver.

Conversely, the US Treasury is expected to sell $331 Billion in new US Treasury fiat obligations in the 3rd quarter of 2011 (alone).  In the 4th quarter they are anticipated to add another $190 Billion of paper debt:

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.0d79a84244dc2d4f0de55e87d89bcbfb.811&show_article=1

I know where I am going to store my wealth going forward and I suspect others will continue trending in that direction as well.

pbreed's picture

Debate with the Devil...

>China has no choice but to hold on to US debt due to their substantial trade surpluses.

Much evidence shows that China is accumulating gold and silver as fast as it can.

Thus part of the trade defficit is funding PM acquisition. By its own numbers the FED monitized more than 70% of the treasury debt in the last year.

Clearly China does not want gold and silver to go to the moon until they have converted their FRN's and Tbills to real money.

question's picture

So, as long as this dollar - oil link is in tact

Aye m8t, there be the rub; I think it's been shown that deals are only worth the paper they're printed on (such as the U$D)

¤'s picture

@robreke

I can't comment on the hyper-inflation aspect of this as there is lots of conjecture what will and won't happen etc.  No one knows what might happen in a unique historical situation where the U.S. "might" go hyper-inflated. It will be a signatire event and not comparable to anything known yet in history (yikes, hate typing that)

I can't comment on #3 as I have no clue about global economics and the interaction's in the market (low U.S. rates) and the effect on trade surpluses vs. interest rates etc. between debtor/creditor nations.

#1. I don't see the banks holding cash because they have total and free access to it from the Fed. for who knows how long or when that may stop. I'm pretty sure they've been spending it and making money off of it. Our taxpayer money is there for the taking, literally. The thing that bothers me a little bit is the new $100 bill not coming out yet when it was supposed to in Feb. 2011 (i think).

Part of me wants to believe after 100's of years of printing money that all of the sudden the U.S. Mints ability to print money efficiently has been lost. (magically somehow)

The cynical part of me believes that they're holding all of that money back that's been printed because they'll need a lot of it rather quickly. Or maybe they are adding a extra zero  or replacing a 1 with a 5 and the $1,000 bill  or $500 bill comes back.

#2 Makes sense as you've written it. I also think China wants our rates low because they are going to actively start selling their own treasury notes and bonds etc. like the U.S. has enjoyed for many years . I do think they will offer a higher interest rate on their bonds as a attractive  enticement to investors. They will gladly pay more then us as a way of siphoning off capital from the U.S. as they know we can not raise rates drastically or much at all. They know were interest rate "trapped" due to our debt.

Pretty negative stuff. But if I'm them, that's what I would do.

Would you care if (you were China) and  gradually lost the $2-3 trillion they hold in US paper as TRILLIONS came gradually pouring in as the rest of the world shifts from US Treasury debt to a Chinese Govt. with a surplus? (supposedly)

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